What is PBMT?

PBMT uses a low-intensity laser beam aimed at various parts of your mouth, helping to reduce Oral mucositis (OM) which is when the lining of your mouth becomes inflamed – a common side effect of radiotherapy and chemo-radiotherapy treatment for head & neck cancer.

OM can be painful. You may have difficulty swallowing. You may also lose weight. In some cases, you might need to have additional medication, or even a feeding tube, as well as more frequent appointments with your multidisciplinary head & neck team.

How can PBMT help?

PBMT is an effective treatment that can reduce the severity and duration of OM. It’s been used for more than 20 years to help reduce this side-effect in patients with head & neck cancers.

It can help by:

  • Encouraging the tissues inside the mouth to heal
  • Reducing inflammation and risk of ulcers
  • Enabling you to swallow more comfortably
  • Reducing pain (so you don’t need to take as much pain relief medicine)
  • Making it less likely that you’ll need to be fed via a tube
  • Improving your quality of life

How does PBMT work with my radiotherapy treatment?

You’ll receive your first PBMT treatment a couple of hours before your first radiotherapy session. Then around 30 minutes before all other radiotherapy sessions. It’s delivered by specially trained PBMT radiographers and takes approximately 30 minutes. You will be asked to wear goggles to ensure your eyes are protected during each treatment.

We advise that you should avoid alcohol and not smoke throughout the course of your treatment. We also provide access to a dietician to assist you.

Are there any side-effects from PBMT?

PBMT is painless, and there are no known side-effects.

Where can you have PBMT?

You can be treated with PBMT at our Southhampton centre:

Spire Hospital, Chalybeate Close, Southampton, SO16 6UY

Telephone: 0238 189 0624
Email: southampton.enquiries@genesiscare.com

We have free on-site parking.

Learn more

Meet our doctors

Our-doctors

Everything we do is focused on designing better care for our patients. With a network of 12 specialist oncology treatment centres across the UK, we provide the most up-to-date treatments and technology as standard.

We attract and retain some of the most experienced doctors in the country, who all have a passion for improving patient outcomes and specialise in the treatment of different types of cancer.

Meet our doctors

Birmingham

Little Aston Hall Drive, Sutton Coldfield, B74 3BF

+44 (0)121 514 1185

Bristol

300 Park Avenue, Aztec West, Bristol, BS32 4SY

+44 (0)1454 642801

Cambridge

Fordham Rd, Newmarket CB8 7XN, UK

+44 (0)1223 633 664

Chelmsford

Springfield Cancer Centre, Lawn Lane, Chelmsford, CM1 7GU

+44 (0)1245 676 351

Cromwell Hospital

164-178 Cromwell Rd, Kensington, London SW5 0TU, UK

+44 (0)203 613 9355

Elstree

Unit 710, Centennial Park, Centennial Avenue, Elstree, Borehamwood, WD6 3SZ

+44 (0)203 613 9356

Guildford

BMI St Martha Oncology Centre, 46 Harvey Road, Guildford, GU1 3LX

+44 (0)1483 676 898

Maidstone

17 Kings Hill Avenue, Kings Hill, West Malling, ME19 4UA

+44 (0)1732 386 599

Milton Keynes

GenesisCare, Sunrise Parkway, Linford Wood, East, Milton Keynes MK14 6LS, UK

+44 (0)1908 448 166

Nottingham

The Park Centre for oncology, Sherwood Lodge Drive, Burntstump Country Park, Nottingham, NG5 8RX

+44 (0)1156 762 989

Oxford

Peters Way, Sandy Lane West, Oxford, OX4 6LB

+44 (0)1865 224 884

Portsmouth

Bartons Road, Havant, PO9 5NA

+44 (0)23 9280 0102

Southampton

Spire Hospital, Chalybeate Close, Southampton, SO16 6UY

+44 (0)238 008 5138

Windsor

69 Alma Road, Windsor, SL4 3HD

+44 (0)1753 465 493

Search for a centre near you

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Diagnostic services you can trust

Oxford

The Siemens Magnetom Skyra 3T scanner in our Oxford Centre provides the highest resolution ultra-sharp imaging available, enabling patients to receive a rapid and accurate diagnosis. With the ability to visualise and monitor changes within the body we can plan individualised therapies and the reduced imaging time provides greater patient comfort.Our sub specialty radiologists provide next day comprehensive, high quality and clinically valuable reports.

Windsor

At Windsor, we have the latest Siemens 3rd generation 1.5T MRI scanner which can image in approximately half the time of a 2nd generation system. The images are of excellent quality, enabling accurate and rapid diagnosis.All images are reviewed within hours and any suspicious findings are reported on immediately, with a full report within 48 hours for normal findings.

Referring is easy

To refer a patient:

Complete the MRI referral MRI referral form OR

Call us:

o Oxford - +44 (0)1865 237 700

o Windsor - +44 (0)1753 418 444

Email:

o Oxford - pao.oxford@genesiscare.co.uk

o Windsor - windsoradministration@genesiscare.co.uk

Also available for your patients

We also offer access to a range of other diagnostics services including:

• PET – CT

• CT

• Digital X-ray / Fluoroscopy

• Ultrasound

Consulting rooms and rooms for minor procedures are also available so that you can offer a wide range of detailed investigations and procedures to your patients.

Competitive pricing for self-pay patients

As you’d expect, we are recognised by all private medical insurers and offer competitive prices for self-pay patients:

• MRI from £450

• CT from £530

• PET-CT from £1,400

Download

MRI referral form

 

 

Please download the referral form and save it to your local drive. Open the local version and once completed select either the Windsor or Oxford email address and the completed form will be attached to an email for easy sending.

 

 

 

New GenesisCare diagnostics centres

The new purpose-built GenesisCare centres in Oxford & Windsor give your insured and self-pay patients fast and easy access to a state-of-the-art diagnostic imaging suite, as well as oncology and wellbeing services, all under one roof.

 

Our Windsor centre is located at:

69 Alma Road
Windsor
SL4 3HD

Our Oxford centre is located at:

Sandy Lane West
Peters Way
Oxford
OX4 6LB

 

Causes of uterus cancer

Risk factors include genetics, being nulliparous (not had children), being overweight/obese, diabetes, lack of physical activity, hormone replacement therapy, polycystic ovary syndrome PCOS, polyps, and Parkinson’s disease.

Longer than average oestrogen exposure, therefore an early menarche and/or late menopause will increase risk. Some oral contraceptives reduce the risk.

Symptoms of uterus cancer

Post-menopausal bleeding Irregular bleeding in pre-menopausal women.

Heavier periods

Blood stained or watery vagina discharge.

Pain/discomfort in pelvis, legs or back.

Pain/discomfort during sex.

Tests and diagnosis

Tests for uterus cancer may include:

  • Physical examination (including internal)
  • Blood tests
  • Ultrasound scan (transvaginal)
  • Biopsy- tissue samples will be taken for analysis (there are several different ways this may be carried out)

Treatments we offer

Radiotherapy kills cancer cells. It’s used in the early stages of cancer treatment or after it has started to spread. It can also be used to relieve pain and discomfort from cancer that has spread.

Read more

Chemotherapy is medication that treats your cancer. The drugs kill cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and spreading further.

Read more

Radiotherapy kills cancer cells. It’s used in the early stages of cancer treatment or after it has started to spread. It can also be used to relieve pain and discomfort from cancer that has spread.

Read more

Chemotherapy is medication that treats your cancer. The drugs kill cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and spreading further.

Read more

Meet our doctors

Our-doctors

Everything we do is focused on designing better care for our patients. With a network of 12 specialist oncology treatment centres across the UK, we provide the most up-to-date treatments and technology as standard.

We attract and retain some of the most experienced doctors in the country, who all have a passion for improving patient outcomes and specialise in the treatment of different types of cancer.

Meet our doctors

 

Primary brain tumours

Malignant brain tumours are rare in adults with around 5,000 new cases a year diagnosed in the UK, accounting for approximately 2% of all new cancer cases (Other brain tumours may be confirmed as benign and some are undiagnosed due to their position preventing a biopsy).

Higher incidence in men, male to female ratio is 1.5:1. Adult brain tumours can occur at any age, the incidence rises from the age of 30 with the highest incidence being between 50 and 70 years of age. Most of these arise in the frontal, temporal and parietal lobes of the cerebrum, 86% are gliomas (includes astrocytomas, ependymomas, oligodendroblastomas and mixed gliomas).

Risk factors and causes are not well understood but radiation is recognised as a cause and radiotherapy for primary brain tumours is associated with a 55% increased risk of further brain tumours.Risk factors include some genetic conditions such as neurofibromatosis, Li-Fraumeni syndrome and a family history of CNS tumours, diabetes in females, Parkinson’s disease and HIV infection or AIDS. (Secondary brain tumours have spread from tumours elsewhere in the body e.g. lung).

The brain-main parts are:

  • The cerebrum (two halves with four lobes on each side- frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital)
  • The cerebellum
  • The brain stem
  • The pituitary gland
CNS

Symptoms of CNS tumours

Headaches

Nausea and vomiting

Drowsiness

Seizures

 

Other symptoms may be related to the functions of the area of the brain where the tumour has developed.Frontal lobe: changes in personality and intellect; uncoordinated walking or weakness of one side of the body; loss of smell; occasional speech difficulties.

Parietal lobe: difficulty speaking or understanding words; problems with writing, reading or doing simple calculations; difficulty coordinating certain movements, and finding your way around; numbness or weakness on one side of the body.

Temporal lobe: seizures, which may cause strange sensations: a feeling of fear or intense familiarity (déjà vu), strange smells or blackouts; speech difficulties; memory problems.

Occipital lobe: loss of vision to one eye, which the person may not notice at first and may sometimes be discovered during routine eye tests.

Cerebellum: lack of coordination; slurred speech (dysarthia); unsteadiness; flickering involuntary movement of the eyes (nystagmus); vomiting and neck stiffness.Brain stem: unsteadiness and an uncoordinated walk; facial weakness, a one-sided smile or drooping eyelid; double vision; difficulty speaking and swallowing; vomiting or headache just after waking (this is rare). Symptoms may appear gradually. Meninges – headaches, sickness and problems with sight and movement.

Pituitary gland: the pituitary gland produces lots of different hormones so a tumour in the gland can cause a variety of symptoms including: irregular periods; infertility; weight gain; lethargy; high blood pressure; diabetes; mood swings; and enlarged hands and feet. A tumour in the pituitary gland can also cause pressure on the nerves to the eyes, causing tunnel vision.

Tests and diagnosis

  • Physical examination (will include neurological test, checking muscle strength, reflexes, sensation, eye tests and hearing tests)
  • Blood tests
  • CT scans
  • Brain MRI scan
  • PET/SPECT scan
  • Surgical biopsy (surgery may be to remove a sample of brain tissue to enable analysis followed by further surgery or in some cases the intention of the initial surgery may be to remove part or all of the tumour)
  • Lumbar puncture
  • Neuroendoscopy

Treatments we cover

Radiotherapy, also called radiation therapy, kills cancer cells. It’s used in the early stages of cancer treatment or after it has started to spread. It can also be used to relieve pain and discomfort from cancer that has spread.

Read more

Chemotherapy is medication that treats your cancer. The drugs kill cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and spreading further.

Read more

Radiotherapy, also called radiation therapy, kills cancer cells. It’s used in the early stages of cancer treatment or after it has started to spread. It can also be used to relieve pain and discomfort from cancer that has spread.

Read more

Chemotherapy is medication that treats your cancer. The drugs kill cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and spreading further.

Read more

Meet our doctors

Our-doctors

Everything we do is focused on designing better care for our patients. With a network of 12 specialist oncology treatment centres across the UK, we provide the most up-to-date treatments and technology as standard.

We attract and retain some of the most experienced doctors in the country, who all have a passion for improving patient outcomes and specialise in the treatment of different types of cancer.

Meet our doctors

 

What is non-melanoma skin cancer

Non-melanoma skin cancer develops slowly in the upper layers of the skin. There are two types:

  • Basal cell carcinomas (BCC) – common and easiest to treat and cure
  • Squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) – treatment may be less successful if other parts of the body have been affected

Non-melanoma skin cancer usually appears on parts of your body exposed to the sun. That’s generally on the face, neck, bald scalp, arms, back of hands and lower legs. Most non-melanoma skin cancers can be cured.

Causes of non-melanoma skin cancers

Basal cell carcinomas are caused mainly by exposure to the sun. They are more common in people with fair skin. Other risk factors include:

  • A history of skin cancer
  • A family history of skin cancer
  • Some rare inherited disorders
  • UV light from a sun lamp

Squamous cell carcinomas are caused by sun exposure, but risk factors also include:

  • A family history of skin cancer
  • A history of skin cancer
  • Drinking too much alcohol
  • Immunosuppressant medicines
  • Injuries, particularly with elderly people
  • Smoking
  • Some rare inherited disorders
  • UV light from a sun lamp

Symptoms of non-melanoma skin cancer

A pink or red lump that doesn’t heal

A scaly area of skin that doesn’t heal

Smooth lump with a pearly appearance

A red or dark coloured spot or sore that doesn’t heal within a month

A red or dark coloured spot or sore that is painful, bleeds or itches

Broken skin that doesn't improve within a month

Red patches on your skin

Having one or more of these symptoms doesn’t mean you have cancer but it’s best to ask your doctor for advice. The sooner your cancer is detected, the better the chances of treating it successfully.

Tests and diagnosis

In most cases, your doctor will be able to give a diagnosis after a physical examination of your skin. They may use a hand-held microscope (or dermatoscope). Sometimes, a biopsy (small sample of skin) may also be taken for analysis.

Treatments we offer

Treatment for non-melanoma skin cancer usually involves surgery and/or radiotherapy.

Radiotherapy kills cancer cells. It’s used in the early stages of cancer treatment or after it has started to spread. It can also be used to relieve pain and discomfort from cancer that has spread.

Read more

Radiotherapy kills cancer cells. It’s used in the early stages of cancer treatment or after it has started to spread. It can also be used to relieve pain and discomfort from cancer that has spread.

Read more

Meet our doctors

Our-doctors

Everything we do is focused on designing better care for our patients. With a network of 12 specialist oncology treatment centres across the UK, we provide the most up-to-date treatments and technology as standard.

We attract and retain some of the most experienced doctors in the country, who all have a passion for improving patient outcomes and specialise in the treatment of different types of cancer.

Meet our doctors

 

What is malignant melanoma?

Malignant melanoma is skin cancer. It’s more common in women than men, and your risk also increases as you get older. It develops from cells called melanocytes. Melanocytes make melanin, which gives skin its colour. Melanin also protects us from ultraviolet (UV) radiation which causes sunburn.

The most common type of melanoma is superficial spreading melanoma. When it starts, it spreads across the skin – not down into the lower layers. It is easier to treat if it’s caught early.

Other types include:

  • Nodular melanoma – this develops faster and grows downwards into lower layers of skin if it’s not treated. It usually starts as a new lump on the surface. It can bleed or ooze
  • Lentigo maligna melanoma – usually affects older people who have spent a lot of time outside in the past. It grows slowly over many years. It can form lumps later on
  • Acral lentiginous melanoma – this cancer is rare and usually develops on the palms and soles of darker skinned people
  • Amelanotic melanoma – another rare type. It can sometimes have no colour at all or be very pale

Most people are over 65 when it’s discovered, but it can also affect younger people. Melanoma can also spread to other areas in the body (metastasise).

What causes malignant melanoma?

The leading cause is UV radiation from being in the sun or using sunbeds. Other reasons include:

  • A family history of melanoma
  • A rare type of birthmark known as giant congenital melanocytic naevus
  • Exposing your skin to intense periods in the sun – for example, during a holiday
  • Having fair skin with fair or reddish hair so you burn easily
  • Having had melanoma or other cancer in the past – especially breast cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, kidney cancer, prostate cancer, thyroid cancer, leukaemia, some childhood cancers
  • Having reduced immunity
  • HIV
  • Moles – the more moles, the higher the risk
  • Other medical conditions such as Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and sarcoidosis

What are the symptoms of malignant melanoma?

Your doctor will examine your skin for anything that looks abnormal. They may refer you to a skin specialist. Tests include:

Bleeds

Changes shape or colour

Gets bigger

Is painful or inflamed

Itches

Looks asymmetricle

Having these symptoms doesn’t mean you have malignant melanoma, but it’s best to get them checked by a doctor. The sooner your cancer is detected, the better the chances of treating it successfully.

Tests and diagnosis

Your doctor will examine your skin for anything that looks abnormal. They may refer you to a skin specialist. Tests include:

  • Biopsy – removing all or part of the mole to check for signs of cancer
  • Dermoscopy – looking closely at your skin, using a kind of magnifying glass, and taking photographs to monitor any changes

In some cases, you may also have:

  • Scans including ultrasound, CT, MRI, PET-CT
  • Lymphatic mapping and sentinel lymph node biopsy

Treatments we offer

Treatments depend on how advanced the melanoma is. At the early stages, melanoma can be treated with surgery alone. In advanced stages, treatment may involve chemotherapy, immunotherapy and radiotherapy.

Radiotherapy kills cancer cells. It’s used in the early stages of cancer treatment or after it has started to spread. It can also be used to relieve pain and discomfort from cancer that has spread.

Read more

Chemotherapy is medication that treats your cancer. The drugs kill cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and spreading further.

Read more

Radiotherapy kills cancer cells. It’s used in the early stages of cancer treatment or after it has started to spread. It can also be used to relieve pain and discomfort from cancer that has spread.

Read more

Chemotherapy is medication that treats your cancer. The drugs kill cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and spreading further.

Read more

Meet our doctors

Our-doctors

Everything we do is focused on designing better care for our patients. With a network of 12 specialist oncology treatment centres across the UK, we provide the most up-to-date treatments and technology as standard.

We attract and retain some of the most experienced doctors in the country, who all have a passion for improving patient outcomes and specialise in the treatment of different types of cancer.

Meet our doctors

 

What is lung cancer?

The lungs are the main organs for breathing and are part of the respiratory system that includes the nose, mouth, windpipe and airways (large airways, bronchi; smaller airways, bronchioles) to each lung. Lung cancer is a cancerous tumour in the tissue of one or both of the lungs.

Primary lung cancer starts in the lungs.
Secondary or metastatic lung cancer can start somewhere else in the body and spread to the lungs.

Primary lung cancer is split into two groups:

Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) – the most common type
Types of non-small cell lung cancer include:

  • Adenocarcinoma – starts in the mucus and affects the smaller airways

 

  • Squamous cell carcinoma – mainly affects the cells that line the tubes into the lungs. It tends to grow in the centre of the lung. It’s usually caused by smoking
  • Large cell carcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma – cancer affecting large round cells

Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) – This is less common (about 1 in 10 lung cancers). It mainly affects smokers and is very rare in people who’ve never smoked.

SCLC tends to start in the middle of the lungs and usually spreads more quickly than NSCLC.

Types of small-cell lung cancer include:

  • Small cell carcinoma
  • Mixed small cell/large cell carcinoma

Types of lung cancer

Tracheal cancer is a rare type of lung cancer, sometimes known as bronchial cancer. That’s because the trachea (or windpipe) has two branches – known as bronchi, and this is where the disease usually starts.

Most tumours that begin in the trachea or bronchi are cancerous.

Read more

Mesothelioma is a rare type of cancer that affects the covering of the lung, called the pleura. It’s almost always caused by exposure to asbestos.

Thoracic cancers are a less common lung cancers that can form in the chest area.

Tracheal cancer is a rare type of lung cancer, sometimes known as bronchial cancer. That’s because the trachea (or windpipe) has two branches – known as bronchi, and this is where the disease usually starts.

Most tumours that begin in the trachea or bronchi are cancerous.

Read more

Mesothelioma is a rare type of cancer that affects the covering of the lung, called the pleura. It’s almost always caused by exposure to asbestos.

Thoracic cancers are a less common lung cancers that can form in the chest area.

Common lung cancer symptoms

A persistent cough that gets worse

Shortness of breath

Weight loss

Feeling very tired

Coughing up blood

Hoarse voice

Wheezing

Regular or persistent chest infections

Treatments we cover

Radiotherapy kills cancer cells. It’s used in the early stages of cancer treatment or after it has started to spread. It can also be used to relieve pain and discomfort from cancer that has spread.

Read more

Chemotherapy is medication that treats your cancer. The drugs kill cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and spreading further.

Read more

Radiotherapy kills cancer cells. It’s used in the early stages of cancer treatment or after it has started to spread. It can also be used to relieve pain and discomfort from cancer that has spread.

Read more

Chemotherapy is medication that treats your cancer. The drugs kill cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and spreading further.

Read more

Meet our doctors

Our-doctors

Everything we do is focused on designing better care for our patients. With a network of 12 specialist oncology treatment centres across the UK, we provide the most up-to-date treatments and technology as standard.

We attract and retain some of the most experienced doctors in the country, who all have a passion for improving patient outcomes and specialise in the treatment of different types of cancer.

Meet our doctors

 

What is tracheal cancer?

Tracheal cancer is a rare type of lung cancer, sometimes known as bronchial cancer. That’s because the trachea (or windpipe) has two branches – known as bronchi, and this is where the disease usually starts.

Most tumours that begin in the trachea or bronchi are cancerous. However, other tumours can spread to the trachea (metastasised) from other parts of the body.

Several types of cancerous tumours affect trachea or bronchi. They each reduce airflow into the lungs by narrowing the opening of the trachea.

  • Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common type of tracheal cancer. It’s mainly caused by smoking. It multiplies and can cause bleeding and ulcers in the trachea. It affects men (aged over 60) more than women
  • Adenoid cystic carcinoma is slow growing. It’s as common in women as in men. It’s not caused by smoking – no one is sure why it develops. People aged 40-60 are most at risk. It can be hard to diagnose because its symptoms are similar to asthma, COPD and bronchitis
  • Carcinoid tumours are also slow growing and are more likely to be found in the bronchi than the trachea. People aged 40-60 are most at risk

Types of non-cancerous tumours include papillomas, chondromas and hemangiomas.

Causes of trachel cancer

It’s not known what causes every type of trachea cancer. However, in some cases, age and smoking are risk factors.

Symptoms of tracheal cancer

These can include:

A hoarse voice

Breathing difficulties

Coughing (with or without blood)

Difficulty swallowing

Frequent chest infections, or fever

Noisy breathing or wheezing

Having one or more of these symptoms doesn’t mean you have cancer but it’s best to ask your doctor for advice. The sooner your cancer is detected, the better the chances of treating it successfully.

Tests and disgnosis

Diagnosing tracheal cancer can be difficult and take time – symptoms are similar to other conditions such as asthma, and develop slowly.

Investigations may include:

  • Bronchoscopy – tissue samples may be taken for biopsy
  • Scans including CT and MRI
  • Tests to see how well the lungs are working (pulmonary function testing)
  • Chest X-ray

Treatments we offer

Tracheal cancers are hard to treat with surgery. Treatments usually include chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

Radiotherapy kills cancer cells. It’s used in the early stages of cancer treatment or after it has started to spread. It can also be used to relieve pain and discomfort from cancer that has spread.

Read more

Chemotherapy is medication that treats your cancer. The drugs kill cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and spreading further.

Read more

Radiotherapy kills cancer cells. It’s used in the early stages of cancer treatment or after it has started to spread. It can also be used to relieve pain and discomfort from cancer that has spread.

Read more

Chemotherapy is medication that treats your cancer. The drugs kill cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and spreading further.

Read more

Meet our doctors

Our-doctors

Everything we do is focused on designing better care for our patients. With a network of 12 specialist oncology treatment centres across the UK, we provide the most up-to-date treatments and technology as standard.

We attract and retain some of the most experienced doctors in the country, who all have a passion for improving patient outcomes and specialise in the treatment of different types of cancer.

Meet our doctors

 

What is vulvar cancer?

Vulvar cancer is slow growing. It mainly affects woman over 65 – it’s rare in women before the menopause.

Most vulvar cancers are squamous cell cancers. They usually develop on the inner edges of the outer vaginal lips and the inner lips. Vulvar cancer can also affect the perineum (the skin between the vulva and the anus).

Some women are diagnosed with precancerous vulvar cells during their routine screening for cervical cancer. Finding and treating precancerous cells early on can prevent vulvar cancer developing.

Causes of vulvar cancer

No one knows exactly what causes vulvar cancer. Some things increase your risk, including:

  • A weakened immune system
  • Cervix cell changes or cervical cancer
  • Having a common sexually transmitted virus known as human papillomavirus (HPV)
  • Smoking increases the risk of VIN and vulvar cancer
  • Some skin conditions, including lichen sclerosus
  • Vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) – when you have abnormal cells in the vulva that may develop into cancer
  • Your age – it’s more likely as you get older

You can reduce your risk by

Going to your cervical screening appointments as this helps detect pre-cancerous conditions

Having a vaccination to protect against getting HPV (which causes some vulval cancers)

Quitting smoking will reduce the chances of developing vulva cancers

Taking precautions against sexually transmitted infections such as HPV (using a condom)

Going to your cervical screening appointments as this helps detect pre-cancerous conditions

Having a vaccination to protect against getting HPV (which causes some vulval cancers)

Quitting smoking will reduce the chances of developing vulva cancers

Taking precautions against sexually transmitted infections such as HPV (using a condom)

Symptoms of vulval cancer

Burning sensation when you urinate

A lump or growth like a wart in the vulva

A mole on the vulva that changes colour or shape

An open sore or growth on the skin that doesn't heal

Pain or soreness around the vulva

Thickened, raised, red, white or dark patches on the surface of the vulva

All these symptoms can be caused by common conditions, such as infection. But if you’re worried, it’s a good idea to get it checked by your doctor.

Tests and diagnosis

Your doctor will ask you about your symptoms and examine the vulva for any unusual lumps or skin changes. They may refer you to a specialist (gynaecologist) for more tests including:

  • A biopsy where a small sample of tissue is removed for analysis
  • Blood tests
  • Colposcopy using a microscope to check for abnormal vaginal cells
  • CT or MRI scan
  • Cystocopy to look inside the bladder
  • Proctoscopy to see inside the bladder
  • X-ray

Treatments we cover

Treatments of vulva cancer include surgery (wide local excision, partial or total vulvectomy, with or without groin lymph node removal), radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

Radiotherapy kills cancer cells. It’s used in the early stages of cancer treatment or after it has started to spread. It can also be used to relieve pain and discomfort from cancer that has spread.

Read more

Chemotherapy is medication that treats your cancer. The drugs kill cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and spreading further.

Read more

Radiotherapy kills cancer cells. It’s used in the early stages of cancer treatment or after it has started to spread. It can also be used to relieve pain and discomfort from cancer that has spread.

Read more

Chemotherapy is medication that treats your cancer. The drugs kill cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and spreading further.

Read more

Meet our doctors

Our-doctors

Everything we do is focused on designing better care for our patients. With a network of 12 specialist oncology treatment centres across the UK, we provide the most up-to-date treatments and technology as standard.

We attract and retain some of the most experienced doctors in the country, who all have a passion for improving patient outcomes and specialise in the treatment of different types of cancer.

Meet our doctors

 

What is vaginal cancer?

Vaginal cancer is cancer that begins in a woman’s vagina, the passage linking the vulva to the neck of the womb (cervix). It’s a rare type of cancer that mostly affects women aged 45 or over.

Causes of vaginal cancer

No one knows precisely what causes vaginal cancer. Some things make it more likely, including:

  • A weakened immune system
  • Cervical cancer or precancerous cells in the cervix
  • Changes in the cells that line the vagina, including vaginal intra-epithelial neoplasia (VAIN)
  • Having a common sexually transmitted virus known as human papillomavirus (HPV)
  • Having the HIV virus
  • If your mother was prescribed a drug called diethystilbestrol (DES) while she was carrying you
  • Radiation therapy to the pelvis
  • Your age – it’s more common in older women

Symptoms of vaginal cancer

It’s unusual to have any symptoms in the early stages of vaginal cancer. You may only discover you’re affected when you get the results of a routine cervical screening test. Diagnosing and treating it early means you have the best chance of recovery.

Symptoms can include:

 

A lump in your vagina

Abnormal bleeding- after sex, between periods or after menopause

Constipation for feeling as if you need to 'go', even when you've just been

Discharge that smells unpleasent

Itching in the vagina that doesn't go away

Pain when you urinate, needing to urinate more often or blood in the pee

Painful sex

Pelvic pain

All these symptoms can be caused by common conditions, such as infection. But if you’re worried, it’s a good idea to get it checked by your doctor. The sooner your cancer is detected, the better the chances of treating it successfully.

Tests and diagnosis

Your doctor will ask about the kind of symptoms you’ve had. They may give you an internal examination to check for anything unusual. You may also have a cervical screening test to check for abnormal cells in your cervix. In some cases, your doctor will refer you to a specialist (gynaecologist) for more tests. These include:

  • A biopsy- to take a small sample of cells for analysis
  • Blood tests
  • Colposcopy- to look inside the vagina
  • Scans including ultrasound, CT, MRI and PET-CT
  • Chest X-ray

Treatments we cover

Treatment for vaginal cancer depends on how advanced the cancer is. Possible treatment options include surgery, external radiotherapy, internal radiotherapy (brachytherapy) and chemotherapy.

Radiotherapy kills cancer cells. It’s used in the early stages of cancer treatment or after it has started to spread. It can also be used to relieve pain and discomfort from cancer that has spread.

Read more

Chemotherapy is medication that treats your cancer. The drugs kill cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and spreading further.

Read more

Radiotherapy kills cancer cells. It’s used in the early stages of cancer treatment or after it has started to spread. It can also be used to relieve pain and discomfort from cancer that has spread.

Read more

Chemotherapy is medication that treats your cancer. The drugs kill cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and spreading further.

Read more

Meet our doctors

Our-doctors

Everything we do is focused on designing better care for our patients. With a network of 12 specialist oncology treatment centres across the UK, we provide the most up-to-date treatments and technology as standard.

We attract and retain some of the most experienced doctors in the country, who all have a passion for improving patient outcomes and specialise in the treatment of different types of cancer.

Meet our doctors

 

What is fallopian tube cancer?

Only 1% of cancers appear in the fallopian tubes, although there is a suspicion that some percentage of ovarian cancers actually appear from the end part of the fallopian tube. Most cancers that affect the fallopian tubes actually start somewhere else – usually in an ovary, breast, or the lining of the uterus (endometrium). This is known as secondary cancer. The most common kind of fallopian tube cancer is adenocarcinoma. Other rarer types include transitional cell and sarcoma.

Causes of fallopian cancer

No one knows why women get fallopian tube cancer. But it’s more likely if you:

  • Are over 50
  • Don’t have children
  • Have close family members with ovarian, breast, endometrial or colorectal cancer
  • Have had a long-term infection of your reproductive system
  • Have Lynch syndrome
  • Inherited a faulty gene (such as BRCA1 or BRCA2)

Symptoms of fallopian tube cancer

In the early stages you may have no signs at all but, as the tumour grows, there may be:

Abnormal bleeding (between periods or after your menopause)

Pain or swelling in your abdomen

Vaginal discharge (watery or bloody)

Having one or more of these signs doesn’t mean you have cancer but it’s best to ask your doctor for advice. The sooner your cancer is detected, the better the chances of treating it successfully.

Tests and diagnosis

Fallopian tube cancer can be challenging to diagnose. Sometimes it’s not discovered until it’s quite advanced. Your doctor will ask about your family history and examine your abdomen to feel for lumps or tenderness. You may also have an internal examination. If your doctor thinks you may have fallopian tube cancer, you’ll be referred to a specialist. Tests may include:

  • Blood test
  • Biopsy using laparoscopy (keyhole surgery) or guided biopsy to take a tiny sample of tissue for testing
  • Scans including pelvic ultrasound, vaginal ultrasound, MRI or CT scan to check for any abnormalities

Treatments we offer

There are options for treatment which your specialist doctor will discuss with you. These include: chemotherapy, surgery and radiotherapy.

Radiotherapy kills cancer cells. It’s used in the early stages of cancer treatment or after it has started to spread. It can also be used to relieve pain and discomfort from cancer that has spread.

Read more

Chemotherapy is medication that treats your cancer. The drugs kill cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and spreading further.

Read more

Radiotherapy kills cancer cells. It’s used in the early stages of cancer treatment or after it has started to spread. It can also be used to relieve pain and discomfort from cancer that has spread.

Read more

Chemotherapy is medication that treats your cancer. The drugs kill cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and spreading further.

Read more

Meet our doctors

Our-doctors

Everything we do is focused on designing better care for our patients. With a network of 12 specialist oncology treatment centres across the UK, we provide the most up-to-date treatments and technology as standard.

We attract and retain some of the most experienced doctors in the country, who all have a passion for improving patient outcomes and specialise in the treatment of different types of cancer.

Meet our doctors

 

What is cervical cancer?

In most cases, cervical cancer develops from a virus known as human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is passed from person to person during sex. There are many different types of HPV. Only a few cause cancer.

Causes of cervical cancer

You’re more likely to get cervical cancer if you:

  • Have the HPV virus
  • Have had multiple sexual partners
  • First had sex aged 14 or younger
  • Are a smoker
  • Have HIV or other sexually transmitted infections
  • Have a family history of cervical cancer
  • Have had previous cancer of the vulva, vagina, kidney, urinary tract (especially if pelvic radiotherapy was received)

You may also be more likely to have cervical cancer if you have other sexually transmitted diseases or if you are on the combined pill (containing synthetic versions of oestrogen and progesterone).

You are half as likely to get cervical cancer if your partner is circumcised. That’s because the risk of the HPV virus is much lower in circumcised men.

In the last thirty years, screening programmes and vaccines have helped reduce the numbers of women with cervical cancer.

Symptoms of cervical cancer

You may have no symptoms in the early stages of cervical cancer. It may only be diagnosed when you have a cervical screening (previously known as a smear test). However, symptoms can include:

Unusual bleeding, for example:

• Irregular bleeding

• Bleeding after the menopause

Pain or discomfort when you have sex or bleeding afterwards

Discharge from the vagina that smells unpleasant

Pain in your pelvis

Tests and diagnosis

Your doctor will discuss your symptoms and give you a thorough physical examination. Tests may also include:

  • An internal examination of your vagina and cervix
  • Blood tests
  • Colposcopy: an examination of the cervix during which a sample of cells may be taken for analysis
  • Cone biopsy: a procedure that involves removing a cone shape of tissue from the womb for analysis
  • Scans: CT chest/abdomen/pelvis, MRI pelvis, PET-CT

Treatments we offer

Cervical cancer can be treated with surgery alone at the early stages. Advanced stages may need combination chemotherapy, external radiotherapy and brachytherapy(internal radiotherapy).

Radiotherapy kills cancer cells. It’s used in the early stages of cancer treatment or after it has started to spread. It can also be used to relieve pain and discomfort from cancer that has spread.

Read more

Chemotherapy is medication that treats your cancer. The drugs kill cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and spreading further.

Read more

Radiotherapy kills cancer cells. It’s used in the early stages of cancer treatment or after it has started to spread. It can also be used to relieve pain and discomfort from cancer that has spread.

Read more

Chemotherapy is medication that treats your cancer. The drugs kill cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and spreading further.

Read more

Meet our doctors

Our-doctors

Everything we do is focused on designing better care for our patients. With a network of 12 specialist oncology treatment centres across the UK, we provide the most up-to-date treatments and technology as standard.

We attract and retain some of the most experienced doctors in the country, who all have a passion for improving patient outcomes and specialise in the treatment of different types of cancer.

Meet our doctors

 

About gynaecological cancer

Each year in Australia around 6000 new cases of gynaecological cancer are diagnosed. Even though there are thousands of new cases every year, awareness of the symptoms is low.

In most cases, the type of gynaecological cancer is named after the part of the body where the cancer first develops.

Types of gynaecological cancer

Cervical cancer begins in the cervix. The cervix is the lower part of the uterus (womb) and joins to the vagina. Abnormal cells in the lining of the cervix grow abnormally in an uncontrolled way.

Cervical cancer is one of the most preventable forms of all cancers. It is easily treated if caught early. It can be triggered by a type of human papilloma virus (HPV) that is sexually acquired.

Read more

The fallopian tubes are part of a woman’s reproductive system and link the ovaries to the uterus (womb). It’s very rare for cancer to start in the fallopian tubes.

Most cancers that affect the fallopian tubes actually start somewhere else – usually in an ovary, breast, or the lining of the uterus (endometrium). This is known as secondary cancer. The most common kind of fallopian tube cancer is adenocarcinoma.

Read more

Most cases of ovarian cancer affect women who have been through the menopause, normally aged over 50.

Ovarian cancer happens when cancerous cells in the ovary grow and multiply in an uncontrolled way. They form a tumour that can spread to other areas of the body. At an early stage, ovarian cancer can be difficult to diagnose.

Read more

Vaginal cancer begins in cells that line the surface of the vagina. It’s a rarer type of cancer.

The vagina is the area between the cervix and the vulva. While other types of cancer can spread to the vagina, it’s unusual for cancer to begin in this area.

It has a good chance of being cured if it’s diagnosed early but if it spreads beyond the vaginal area, it’s more difficult to treat.

Read more

Cancer of the vulva is relatively rare. It can start in any part of the external female sex organs.

This includes the opening of the vagina, the inner and outer lips (also called labia minora and labia majora), the clitoris and the mons pubis (soft, fatty mound of tissue, above the labia).

Read more

Risk factors include genetics, being nulliparous (not had children), being overweight/obese, diabetes, lack of physical activity, hormone replacement therapy, polycystic ovary syndrome PCOS, polyps, Parkinson’s disease.

Read more

Cervical cancer begins in the cervix. The cervix is the lower part of the uterus (womb) and joins to the vagina. Abnormal cells in the lining of the cervix grow abnormally in an uncontrolled way.

Cervical cancer is one of the most preventable forms of all cancers. It is easily treated if caught early. It can be triggered by a type of human papilloma virus (HPV) that is sexually acquired.

Read more

The fallopian tubes are part of a woman’s reproductive system and link the ovaries to the uterus (womb). It’s very rare for cancer to start in the fallopian tubes.

Most cancers that affect the fallopian tubes actually start somewhere else – usually in an ovary, breast, or the lining of the uterus (endometrium). This is known as secondary cancer. The most common kind of fallopian tube cancer is adenocarcinoma.

Read more

Most cases of ovarian cancer affect women who have been through the menopause, normally aged over 50.

Ovarian cancer happens when cancerous cells in the ovary grow and multiply in an uncontrolled way. They form a tumour that can spread to other areas of the body. At an early stage, ovarian cancer can be difficult to diagnose.

Read more

Vaginal cancer begins in cells that line the surface of the vagina. It’s a rarer type of cancer.

The vagina is the area between the cervix and the vulva. While other types of cancer can spread to the vagina, it’s unusual for cancer to begin in this area.

It has a good chance of being cured if it’s diagnosed early but if it spreads beyond the vaginal area, it’s more difficult to treat.

Read more

Cancer of the vulva is relatively rare. It can start in any part of the external female sex organs.

This includes the opening of the vagina, the inner and outer lips (also called labia minora and labia majora), the clitoris and the mons pubis (soft, fatty mound of tissue, above the labia).

Read more

Risk factors include genetics, being nulliparous (not had children), being overweight/obese, diabetes, lack of physical activity, hormone replacement therapy, polycystic ovary syndrome PCOS, polyps, Parkinson’s disease.

Read more

Treatments we offer

Radiotherapy kills cancer cells. It’s used in the early stages of cancer treatment or after it has started to spread. It can also be used to relieve pain and discomfort from cancer that has spread.

Read more

Chemotherapy is medication that treats your cancer. The drugs kill cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and spreading further.

Read more

Radiotherapy kills cancer cells. It’s used in the early stages of cancer treatment or after it has started to spread. It can also be used to relieve pain and discomfort from cancer that has spread.

Read more

Chemotherapy is medication that treats your cancer. The drugs kill cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and spreading further.

Read more

Meet our doctors

Our-doctors

Everything we do is focused on designing better care for our patients. With a network of 12 specialist oncology treatment centres across the UK, we provide the most up-to-date treatments and technology as standard.

We attract and retain some of the most experienced doctors in the country, who all have a passion for improving patient outcomes and specialise in the treatment of different types of cancer.

Meet our doctors

Types of blood cancer

Leukaemia affects the white blood cells that are made in the bone marrow. White blood cells are important because they protect the body from infection. Some types of leukaemia develop faster than others.

Each type of leukaemia needs different treatment.

Read more

Lymphoma is a type of blood cancer that affects the lymphatic system. It happens when a type of white blood cells (lymphocytes) develop abnormally.

Normally, lymphocytes help fight infection. Lymphoma affects the immune system. It can cause swellings in your neck, armpit, groin or deeper inside your body.

Hodgkin’s lymphoma is a rare type of cancer.  NHL is an unusual cancer but it’s more common in men aged over 65.

Read more

Lymphoma is a type of blood cancer that affects the lymphatic system. It happens when a type of white blood cells (lymphocytes) develop abnormally.

Normally, lymphocytes help fight infection. Lymphoma affects the immune system. It can cause swellings in your neck, armpit, groin or deeper inside your body.

Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) starts in the white blood cells (lymphocytes). White blood cells are part of the immune system.

Read more

The thymus is a small gland located in the chest. It helps the body to develop white blood cells called T lymphocytes.

Most thymus tumours develop at the front of the chest. In very rare cases, they can form in the neck. Cancer of the thymus gland is rare, and it can be difficult to diagnose and treat.

Read more

Myeloma is a blood cancer that begins in the bone marrow cells (plasma cells). It can develop anywhere there’s bone marrow such as the spine, pelvis, ribs and skull. It can start in more than one place, so it’s sometimes called multiple myeloma.

Read more

Lymphoma happens when B-lymphocytes, white blood cells that help fight infection, multiply abnormally. They gather in the lymph nodes (glands), often in the neck, armpits or groin. They can also collect in lymph nodes in other parts of your body. These abnormal cells stop the body from being able to fight infection.

Read more

Leukaemia affects the white blood cells that are made in the bone marrow. White blood cells are important because they protect the body from infection. Some types of leukaemia develop faster than others.

Each type of leukaemia needs different treatment.

Read more

Lymphoma is a type of blood cancer that affects the lymphatic system. It happens when a type of white blood cells (lymphocytes) develop abnormally.

Normally, lymphocytes help fight infection. Lymphoma affects the immune system. It can cause swellings in your neck, armpit, groin or deeper inside your body.

Hodgkin’s lymphoma is a rare type of cancer.  NHL is an unusual cancer but it’s more common in men aged over 65.

Read more

Lymphoma is a type of blood cancer that affects the lymphatic system. It happens when a type of white blood cells (lymphocytes) develop abnormally.

Normally, lymphocytes help fight infection. Lymphoma affects the immune system. It can cause swellings in your neck, armpit, groin or deeper inside your body.

Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) starts in the white blood cells (lymphocytes). White blood cells are part of the immune system.

Read more

The thymus is a small gland located in the chest. It helps the body to develop white blood cells called T lymphocytes.

Most thymus tumours develop at the front of the chest. In very rare cases, they can form in the neck. Cancer of the thymus gland is rare, and it can be difficult to diagnose and treat.

Read more

Myeloma is a blood cancer that begins in the bone marrow cells (plasma cells). It can develop anywhere there’s bone marrow such as the spine, pelvis, ribs and skull. It can start in more than one place, so it’s sometimes called multiple myeloma.

Read more

Lymphoma happens when B-lymphocytes, white blood cells that help fight infection, multiply abnormally. They gather in the lymph nodes (glands), often in the neck, armpits or groin. They can also collect in lymph nodes in other parts of your body. These abnormal cells stop the body from being able to fight infection.

Read more

Treatments we cover

Chemotherapy is medication that treats your cancer. The drugs kill cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and spreading further.

Read more

Chemotherapy is medication that treats your cancer. The drugs kill cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and spreading further.

Read more

Meet our doctors

Our-doctors

Everything we do is focused on designing better care for our patients. With a network of 12 specialist oncology treatment centres across the UK, we provide the most up-to-date treatments and technology as standard.

We attract and retain some of the most experienced doctors in the country, who all have a passion for improving patient outcomes and specialise in the treatment of different types of cancer.

Meet our doctors

 

What is urethral cancer?

The most common kind of urethral cancer is called squamous cell carcinoma. It develops near the bladder in women and the lining of the urethra inside the penis in men. Other types include:

  • Adenocarcinocama: develops near the glands around the urethra in men and women
  • Transitional cell rcinoma: develops near the opening of the urethra in women and near the prostate gland in men

Causes of urethral cancer

  • No one knows precisely what causes urethral cancer. Risk factors include:
  • Being over 60, white and female
  • Frequent urinary tract infections (UTIs)
  • Having had bladder cancer
  • Have a common sexually transmitted virus known as human papillomavirus (HPV)
  • Previous radiation therapy (men)
  • Previous sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) that have led to inflammation of the urethra

Symptoms of urethral cancer

There may be no signs at first. As time goes on, symptoms can include:

A lump in the groin

A lump or hard mass in your genital tract (advanced cancer)

Blood in your urine (haematuria)

Frequent need to urinate, espically at night

Incontinence

Trouble starting to urinate

Weak or interrupted flow of urine

Having one or more of these signs doesn’t mean you have cancer but it’s best to ask your doctor for advice. The sooner your cancer is detected, the better the chances of treating it successfully.

Tests and diagnosis

Your doctor will discuss your symptoms and may feel your abdomen. You may also have a vaginal or rectal examination. They may arrange for you to see a specialist for more tests.

These may include:

  • Biopsy to remove some cells for further analysis
  • Cystoscopy– a camera test to look inside the bladder and take biopsies from the bladder wall
  • Scans including CT chest/abdomen/pelvis and MRI abdomen/pelvis
  • Urine tests to look for blood and cancer cells in the urine
  • Uteroscopy to look inside the ureter. A tiny sample of tissue may be taken for analysis (biopsy)

Treatments we cover

Urethral cancer is difficult to treat due to its location. Treatments may include surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy depending on how advanced the tumour is.

Radiotherapy kills cancer cells. It’s used in the early stages of cancer treatment or after it has started to spread. It can also be used to relieve pain and discomfort from cancer that has spread.

Read more

Chemotherapy is medication that treats your cancer. The drugs kill cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and spreading further.

Read more

Radiotherapy kills cancer cells. It’s used in the early stages of cancer treatment or after it has started to spread. It can also be used to relieve pain and discomfort from cancer that has spread.

Read more

Chemotherapy is medication that treats your cancer. The drugs kill cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and spreading further.

Read more

Meet our doctors

Our-doctors

Everything we do is focused on designing better care for our patients. With a network of 12 specialist oncology treatment centres across the UK, we provide the most up-to-date treatments and technology as standard.

We attract and retain some of the most experienced doctors in the country, who all have a passion for improving patient outcomes and specialise in the treatment of different types of cancer.

Meet our doctors

 

Cancer of the ureter

Cancer of the renal pelvis (small area in the centre of the kidney that the ureter arises from) and ureter are very rare. They are considered bladder cancers rather than kidney cancers. Higher incidence in men than women. The incidence rises from the age of 65 years and is even rarer under this age.

Risk factors are smoking, heavy usage of phenacetin (a pain relieve drug that is now banned) and possibly arsenic in drinking water. Over 90% of the tumours are transitional cell carcinomas.

Symptoms of ureter cancer

Blood/blood clots in the urine (haematuria)

Pain in the side of lower back

Pain or burning sensation on passing urine

Difficulty in passing urine

Some of these symptoms can be caused by other conditions such as infection.

Tests and diagnosis

Your doctor will discuss your symptoms and give you a thorough physical examination. Tests may also include:

  • Urine tests (likely to be carried out initially to investigate for possible urinary tract infection or blood in the urine if not apparent)
  • CT scan –may be a CT urogram (CT scan of the urinary tract)
  • Intravenous urogram (IVU) –x-ray of the urinary system
  • Utereroscopy

Treatments we offer

Radiotherapy kills cancer cells. It’s used in the early stages of cancer treatment or after it has started to spread. It can also be used to relieve pain and discomfort from cancer that has spread.

Read more

Chemotherapy is medication that treats your cancer. The drugs kill cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and spreading further.

Read more

Radiotherapy kills cancer cells. It’s used in the early stages of cancer treatment or after it has started to spread. It can also be used to relieve pain and discomfort from cancer that has spread.

Read more

Chemotherapy is medication that treats your cancer. The drugs kill cancer cells, preventing them from dividing and spreading further.

Read more

Meet our doctors

Our-doctors

Everything we do is focused on designing better care for our patients. With a network of 12 specialist oncology treatment centres across the UK, we provide the most up-to-date treatments and technology as standard.

We attract and retain some of the most experienced doctors in the country, who all have a passion for improving patient outcomes and specialise in the treatment of different types of cancer.

Meet our doctors