Highly advanced treatment machine arrives at new integrated cancer centre in Maitland

Maitland, New South Wales – Cancer patients in the Maitland and the Hunter region will soon be able to access the latest radiation therapy technology and techniques closer to home, thanks to the arrival of a world-class radiation therapy treatment machine at GenesisCare’s new integrated cancer centre in Maitland.

The new integrated cancer centre, set to open at the end of this year, will offer patients access to radiation therapy, medical oncology, sophisticated imaging, pathology, and allied health services in one custom-built space.

The centre will be home to a highly advanced linear accelerator, the Elekta Versa HD, capable of delivering the latest treatment techniques, including Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR) and Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS), treatments that target tumours in fewer high dose treatments than traditional therapy.

GenesisCare Radiation Oncologist, Associate Professor Peter O’Brien, said the delivery and installation of the new technology was a key milestone in the opening of the new cancer centre in Maitland.

“At GenesisCare we are committed to ensuring all cancer patients, regardless of where they live, can receive access to the latest treatments and technology, closer to home.”

“The advanced linear accelerator we have just installed in Maitland will allow many patients to receive their care locally, including stereotactic radiation therapy, which involves delivering a high dose of radiation therapy typically in 3 to 5 treatments, destroying cancer cells while minimising damage to surrounding healthy tissues.”

“Many of our patients juggle treatment with full time work or family duties so the combination of local access and the latest technology will reduce the impact of treatment on their daily lives.”

The linear accelerator will also provide an important additional treatment to surgery for patients with advanced or complex non-melanoma skin cancer including basal cell carcinomas (CCC) and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). This technology allows treatment to complex curved body surfaces which is particularly valuable for patients with cancer affecting wide areas of skin.

Karl Mayoh, Director of Erilyan, who built the bunker which will house the new technology, said: “Building the bunker was an incredible challenge during the peak of the Delta outbreak, coordinating multiple subcontractors, suppliers and project stakeholders to ensure we were able to remain on schedule.”

“From the outset of this project, we wanted to ensure as many of the subcontractors were locals so we could support the local economy. Seventy-five per cent of our subcontracts hailed from the region.”

“This wonderful project has provided great benefit to the community, not only when it opens to patients, but also during the construction phase through the generation of wonderful job opportunities for the region,” said Mr Mayoh.

Steve Wile, Site Builder and Owner of the Building, said it was fantastic to be on site to see the impressive technology arriving and the exciting milestone was a credit to the tireless work and problem solving of the entire project team.

“We’ve had to overcome a lot of challenges the last few months, constantly adapting to the evolving COVID-19 situation to ensure we can still open the doors to this fantastic facility in December.”

“The base build is progressing really well and it will be Christmas come early for patients, their families, and the entire region, when we open in a few short months,” said Mr Wile.

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