7 things you should know about breast cancer screening

Recommended cancer screenings for men by age

The American Cancer Society shares that cancer deaths have fallen 32% from its peak between 1991 and 2019. This increase in length and quality of life is highly attributed not only to advancements in treatment and technology, but also to early detection. December 5-9 is National Cancer Screen Week and a perfect time for you to familiarize yourself with the recommended screenings for men.

Ages 21 to 39

  • Skin cancer screening: See your dermatologist yearly for a skin check. Perform regular self-checks in between visits.1

Ages 40 to 49 

  • Skin cancer screening: See your dermatologist yearly for a skin check. Perform regular self-checks in between visits.
  • Colon cancer screening: Talk to your doctor if you should be screened for colon cancer beginning at the age of 45. Discuss all your options, including a colonoscopy every 10 years, an annual fecal immunochemical test (FIT), or an annual guaiac-based fecal occult blood test.2
  • Prostate cancer screening: Talk to your physician if you have a family history of prostate cancer or other factors that may put you at high risk. Discuss the risks and benefits of undergoing periodic prostate-antigen (PSA) screening tests.3

Ages 50 to 64 

  • Skin cancer screening: See your dermatologist yearly for a skin check. Perform regular self-checks in between visits.1
  • Colon cancer screening: Talk to your doctor about which colon cancer screening options are appropriate for you. Options may include a colonoscopy every 10 years, an annual FIT test, or an annual guaiac-based fecal occult blood test. 2
  • Lung cancer screening: Get a lung screening through a low-dose CT scan if you have a 20 pack-year history, currently smoke, or have quit smoking within the past 15 years. A pack-year is the number of packs smoked per day, multiplied by the number of years smoked. Discuss discontinuing screening with your physician if you have not smoked for 15 years.4
  • Prostate cancer screening: Discuss the risks and benefits of undergoing periodic prostate-antigen (PSA) screening tests.

Ages 65 and above

  • Skin cancer screening: See your dermatologist yearly for a skin check. Perform regular self-checks in between visits.1
  • Colon cancer screening: Talk to your doctor about which colon cancer screening options are appropriate for you. Options may include a colonoscopy every 10 years, an annual FIT test, or an annual guaiac-based fecal occult blood test. Talk to your physician about the risks and benefits of screening through the age of 85.2
  • Lung cancer screening: Get a lung screening through a low-dose CT scan if you have a 20 pack-year history, currently smoke, or have quit smoking within the past 15 years. A pack-year is the number of packs smoked per day, multiplied by the number of years smoked. Discuss discontinuing screening with your physician if you have not smoked for 15 years or are over the age of 80.
  • Prostate cancer screening: Discuss the risks and benefits of undergoing periodic prostate-antigen (PSA) screening tests. Consider discontinuing screening at the age of 70 after discussing with your physician.3

The above recommendations are for men at average risk of developing cancer. Cancer screenings are recommended for individuals that are asymptomatic, or not currently exhibiting symptoms. Talk to your healthcare provider about your individual risk factors, which screenings are appropriate for you, or if you have any concerning symptoms. 

References

7 things you should know about breast cancer screening
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