World-Class Cancer Care in Key West, FL

Serving patients since 1994

Call now: 305-296-0021
Title
Key West Cancer Care

This is a better world of care. This is GenesisCare.

At our Marta A. Gonzalez Cancer Center in Key West, FL, you gain access to a global network in comprehensive cancer care. That means thousands of the world’s top cancer minds collaborating with you for a personalized approach. Skilled medical oncologists and radiation oncologists offer advanced technologies to deliver the best possible life outcomes combined with care that’s personalized to each patient.

Services we offer

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Meet Our Physicians

Lawrence Tepper

DO

Medical Oncologist

Key West (Medical oncology)

Geoffrey Geiger

MD, FACRO

Radiation Oncologist

Key West (Radiation oncology)

Sos Nalghranyan

MD

Medical Oncologist

Key West (Medical oncology)

The GenesisCare Approach to Treating Metastatic Disease

View Our Centers

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Key West (Radiation Oncology)

3426 North Roosevelt Boulevard Key West, Florida 33040

305-296-0021
305-296-0021
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Key West (Medical Oncology)

3426 North Roosevelt Boulevard Key West, Florida 33040

305-296-0021
305-296-0021

Traveling to Key West for cancer care

People come from far and wide to experience the unparalleled beauty, amenities and attractions of Key West. That includes out-of-state patients traveling for high quality cancer care. Below are some general travel resources that may be helpful if you’re planning a trip to Key West. Special hotel and vacation rental rates may be available for GenesisCare patients. Call 305-396-0021 for more information.

 

 

Please note: These are external links, not endorsed by or affiliated with GenesisCare.

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Cancers we treat

Brain and spinal cord cancers

The brain and spinal cord make up the central nervous system (CNS). The brain sends signals down the nerves of your spinal cord to the rest of the body to coordinate your muscles and internal organ functions.

Cancers develop when normal cells start to grow uncontrollably and form a mass known as a tumor. There are two main types of tumors that are found in the brain and spinal cord:

  • Primary tumor – cancerous cells that have originated in the brain/spinal cord and formed a tumor
  • Secondary tumor (metastasis) – a tumor that has originated in another part of the body and has spread to the brain/spinal cord

Secondary tumors in the brain and spinal cord are more common than primary tumors. It is estimated that approximately 35,000 patients will be diagnosed with a primary brain tumor each year in the U.S., and 140,000 patients with brain metastasis. Malignant (cancerous) brain and spinal tumors are relatively rare compared to other types of cancer.

Because they are located in such a critical area — cancers of the CNS are complicated to treat — which is why we work with teams of highly specialized clinicians to offer you the latest treatment plans.

Brain cancer journey

Find out more about the treatment journey for brain cancer, from diagnosis to survival.

Breast cancer

What is breast cancer?

Breast cancer is the abnormal growth of the cells lining the breast lobules or ducts. These cells grow uncontrollably and have the potential to spread to other parts of the body.

Breast cancer is the second most common cancer to affect women in the United States, but it can also affect men. It’s predominantly a disease that occurs among postmenopausal women, with 70% of all cases in women older than 55 years.

Fortunately, early diagnosis and advances in breast cancer treatment have enhanced the chances of survival.

Breast cancer may be broken down into two types: non-invasive and invasive. diagnosed with a primary brain tumor each year in the U.S., and 140,000 patients with brain metastasis. Malignant (cancerous) brain and spinal tumors are relatively rare compared to other types of cancer.

Because they are located in such a critical area — cancers of the CNS are complicated to treat — which is why we work with teams of highly specialized clinicians to offer you the latest treatment plans.

Breast cancer journey

Find out more about the treatment journey for breast cancer, from diagnosis to survival.

Non-invasive

Non-invasive breast cancer is when the abnormal cells haven’t spread from their original location, this is typically in the milk producing glands or ducts. These tumors can’t usually be felt by your doctor and instead are most frequently identified by routine mammography. 90% of women diagnosed with non-invasive disease are ultimately cured. Types of non-invasive breast cancer include:

  • Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) – Cancer cells are found within the milk ducts of the breast. This is usually treated with surgery and breast radiation therapy.
  • Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) – Abnormal cells are found within breast lobules, but it’s not cancer. Although LCIS increases the risk of developing cancer, most women with this condition won’t go on to develop breast cancer. This is usually treated with surgery alone.

Invasive

Invasive forms of breast cancer have spread beyond the ducts into other nearby tissue of the breast. Infiltrating ductal carcinoma is an early invasive breast cancer and by far the most common form, accounting for over 90% of all cases. Other types of invasive breast cancer include:

  • Locally advanced breast cancer, where the cancer has spread to other areas nearby, such as the chest wall (including the skin and muscles of the chest) and lymph nodes. This is usually treated with a combination of surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy.
  • Secondary (metastatic or advanced) breast cancer, where cancer has spread to other parts of the body, such as the bones, liver or lungs. Secondary breast cancer is commonly treated with chemotherapy, immunotherapy, targeted therapy or hormone therapy.
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Gastrointestinal cancer

Gastrointestinal (GI) cancer is the name for cancers affecting the digestive system (or GI tract).

Types of Gastrointestinal cancer

Colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer, sometimes called colon cancer or bowel cancer, is the fourth most common cancer type in the U.S with an estimated 145,000 new cases in 2019. Our teams of expert oncologists continually evaluate the latest colorectal cancer treatments so we can offer the most up-to-date options to every patient without delay.

The colon and rectum are part of your digestive system. The colon is the first four to five feet of the large intestine (also called the large bowel) and the rectum is the last five inches that connects the colon to the anus.

Sometimes small growths of tissue known as polyps can form in the lining of the colon and rectum. These look like small spots and they may become cancerous over time. Colorectal cancer typically grows from these polyps slowly over a period of years.

Colorectal cancer journey

Find out more about the treatment journey for colorectal cancer, from diagnosis to survival.

Esophageal cancer

Esophageal cancer is relatively rare in the U.S., accounting for only 1% of all cancers diagnosed. It’s three times more common in men and mostly affects individuals over the age of 65. Our teams of specialist oncologists continually evaluate the latest esophageal cancer treatments so we can offer the most up-to-date options to every patient without delay.

The esophagus is part of the digestive system and carries food from the mouth to the stomach. It is 10 to 13 inches long, and less than an inch wide at its smallest point.

Esophageal cancer develops when cells in the esophagus become abnormal and grow at an uncontrollable rate. These cancerous cells can accumulate into a tumor and this may occur in any part of the esophagus (upper, middle or lower).

Esophageal cancer may be broken down into two types, depending on the cells in which the cancer originated. These are:

  • Esophageal adenocarcinoma– the cancer starts in the mucus glands of the esophagus. This usually develops in the lower part of the esophagus, at the junction with the stomach
  • Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma– the cancer starts in the cells that make up the inner lining of the esophagus. This often occurs in the upper and middle part of the esophagus

Esophageal cancer journey

Find out more about the treatment journey for esophageal cancer, from diagnosis to survival.

Liver cancer

Your liver is a large organ which filters your blood. It also makes important proteins, metabolizes fats, and stores carbohydrates which the body uses for energy.

Cancer occurs when the cells in the body start to grow uncontrollably. These abnormal cells accumulate to form a tumor. Liver cancer can be categorized into two types, primary and secondary.

  • Primary liver cancer – This is when the cancerous cells originate in the liver. The most common type of primary liver cancer is hepatocellular carcinoma. More rare types of liver cancer include intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and hepatoblastoma.
  • Secondary liver cancer – Cancer that has spread (metastasized) to the liver from another part of the body is called secondary liver cancer. This means it’s an advanced cancer. Secondary liver cancer is much more common than primary liver cancer, and is named after the area of the body that the cancerous cells originated from.

In the U.S., primary liver cancer affects about 40,000 people each year, with this number increasing annually. Men are also around three times more likely to get primary liver cancer than women.

Liver cancer journey

Find out more about the treatment journey for liver cancer, from diagnosis to survival.

Stomach cancer

In the U.S., stomach cancer is more common in men than women and about two thirds of people diagnosed are 65 or older.

Stomach cancer, or gastric cancer, typically begins in the cells that line the stomach wall or inside the stomach itself. The cells acquire abnormal changes and start to grow uncontrollably to form a tumor. This process tends to be quite slow. Stomach cancers rarely cause symptoms in the early stages and can go undetected for several years. As the tumor grows, it may start to spread to nearby organs, such as the liver and pancreas.

The most common type of stomach cancer is an adenocarcinoma, this is when the tumor originates from the cells lining the stomach that produce mucus and stomach acid. Other stomach cancers include lymphomas (in the stomach wall) and leiomyosarcomas (in smooth muscle of the stomach). Stomach cancers can also be named according to their location, for example, if the tumor is located at the place where the top of the stomach meets the bottom of the esophagus, you may hear it be described as gastroesophageal junction cancer.

Stomach cancer journey

Find out more about the treatment journey for stomach cancer, from diagnostics to survivorship

Genitourinary cancer

There are many different type of genitourinary cancers which effect both men and women.

Types of Genitourinary cancer

Bladder cancer

Bladder cancer develops when the healthy cells that make up the lining of your bladder start to grow uncontrollably and form a tumor. This tumor can either stay in the lining or spread to nearby muscle.

The bladder is part of the urinary tract which is important in passing waste out of your body. Urine passes from the kidneys and down the ureters into the bladder before it is excreted through your urethra.

A lot of bladder cancers may also be called ‘transitional cell carcinomas’ – where the cancer originates in the transitional cells of your bladder. They can also be grouped depending on where in the bladder the tumor is found, the three types are:

  • Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer: the most common type. It only affects the lining of the bladder
  • Muscle-invasive bladder cancer:when cancer spreads into muscle around the bladder. It’s then more likely to spread to other areas of the body (metastasize)
  • Advanced bladder cancer: where bladder cancer has already spread (metastasized) to other parts of the body

Bladder cancer journey

Find out more about the treatment journey for bladder cancer, from diagnostics to survivorship

Kidney cancer

Kidney cancer occurs when cells in the kidney start to grow uncontrollably. These abnormal cells accumulate into a mass, known as a tumor.

The kidneys are a pair of organs that are essential to your urinary system. Their job is to filter waste products and extra water from the blood while producing urine.

Most people have two kidneys, and usually, kidney cancer only affects one of them. The most common type of kidney cancer in adults is renal cell carcinoma (RCC). It starts in the small tubes of the kidneys. There are three main types of RCC, these are:

  • Clear cell, which is the most common
  • Chromophobe
  • Papillary

In the U.S., kidney cancer is the sixth most common cancer type in men and the eighth in women, however, it rarely occurs in people under the age of 55. Children are more likely to develop a kind of kidney cancer called Wilms’ tumor.

If it’s diagnosed early enough, and it hasn’t spread, kidney cancer is often treatable.

Kidney cancer journey

Find out more about the treatment journey for kidney cancer, from diagnostics to survivorship

Testicular cancer

Testicular cancer is rare compared to other cancer types, however, it is the most common cancer in American males between the ages of 15 and 35. Unlike prostate cancer, testicular cancer is uncommon in older men.

Testicular cancer occurs well the cells in the testicles (testes) start to grow uncontrollably and accumulate into a mass known as a tumor. More than 90% of testicular cancers originate in the germ cells, which produce sperm. The two main types of germ cell tumors in the testicle are seminomas and non-seminomas, and there are further subtypes to each of these. Despite the numerous different kinds of testicular cancer, all men who develop testicular cancer are born with an abnormality on their 12th chromosome.

When detected early, testicular cancer is easily curable. Treatment usually involves surgery to remove the testicle, but you may also need chemotherapy or radiation therapy.

Testicular cancer journey

Find out more about the treatment journey for testicular cancer, from diagnostics to survivorship

Gynecological cancer

Gynecological cancers affect a woman’s reproductive system. They can happen to women of all ages but are most common if you’re over 50.

Types of Gynecological cancers

Cervical cancer

The cervix is the entrance to the uterus from the vagina. Cervical cancer develops when the cells of the cervix transform and start to grow at an uncontrollable rate. These abnormal cells accumulate to form a tumor.

Most cervical cancer cases are diagnosed in women under the age of 50 through their regular Pap smear. Cervical cancer is one of the most preventable forms of all cancers and because it is typically slow growing, it’s easily treated if caught early.

Cervical cancer journey

Find out more about the treatment journey for cervical cancer, from diagnosis to survival.

Cervical cancer

The two ovaries are part of the female reproductive system. They produce the female sex hormones estrogen and progesterone which control your menstrual cycle, and an egg each month during your fertile years.

Ovarian cancer develops when cells in the ovary grow and multiply in an uncontrolled way. They accumulate to form a tumor which – if not treated – can spread to other areas of the body. At an early stage, ovarian cancer can be difficult to diagnose.

The type of ovarian cancer you have depends on the kind of cell your cancer started in. The three main types of ovarian cancer are:

  • Epithelial tumors – these begin in the epithelial cells that cover the ovaries. Around 90% of all ovarian cancers are epithelial tumors
  • Stromal tumors – this is a less common type of ovarian cancer which starts in the cells that produce hormones. These tumors are generally diagnosed quicker than other types of ovarian cancers, and they make up about 7% of ovarian cancer cases
  • Germ cell tumors – these begin in the egg-producing cells of the ovaries. Germ cell tumors are a rare kind of ovarian cancer and most often occur in younger women

Ovarian cancer journey

Find out more about the treatment journey for ovarian cancer, from diagnosis to survival.

Head and neck cancer

Head and neck cancers are a broad category of cancers that are found in the head and neck region. They’re named after the location where the cancerous cells originate, and they usually begin in skin cells called squamous cells that line moist, mucus-producing surfaces.

Head and neck cancers can be found in the:

  • Mouth—including the roof, tongue, gums, and lips
  • Throat
  • Voice box (larynx)
  • Nose and nasal cavity
  • Salivary glands
  • Sinuses (the spaces in between the bones of your face)
  • Middle ear

Head and neck cancers are relatively uncommon in the U.S., accounting for about 4% of all cancer cases. Around 65,000 people develop head and neck cancer in the U.S. each year. If detected at an early stage, head and neck cancers are often treatable.

Head and neck cancer journey

Find out more about the treatment journey for head and neck cancer, from diagnosis to survival.

Lung cancer

Lung cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the U.S., with over 200,000 new cases each year. Our teams of expert oncologists and pulmonologists continually evaluate the latest lung cancer treatments so we can offer the most up-to-date options to every patient without delay.

The lungs are the main organs for breathing and are part of the respiratory system that includes the nose, mouth, windpipe and airways to each lung. Lung cancer develops when cells in the body start to grow uncontrollably and accumulate to form a cancerous tumor in the tissue of one or both of the lungs.

Lung cancer can be categorized into two types, primary and secondary.

Primary lung cancer

This is when the cancerous cells originate in the lung. Primary lung cancer can be further split into two groups:

Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)
This is the most common type of primary lung cancer – about 9 out of 10 cases.

Types of non-small cell lung cancer include:

  • Adenocarcinoma – starts in the mucus and affects the smaller airways
  • Squamous cell carcinoma – mainly affects the cells that line the tubes into the lungs. It tends to grow in the center of the lung and is usually caused by smoking
  • Large cell carcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma – cancer affecting large round cells

Small cell lung cancer (SCLC)
This is much less common and it mainly affects smokers.

SCLC tends to start in the middle of the lungs and usually spreads more quickly than NSCLC. Types of small cell lung cancer include:

  • Small cell carcinoma
  • Mixed small cell/large cell carcinoma

Secondary lung cancer

Cancer that has spread (metastasized) to the lung from another part of the body is called secondary lung cancer. This means it’s an advanced cancer.

Less common lung cancers include:

  • Tracheal cancer – a type of lung cancer which starts in the trachea (windpipe) or one of its two branches (the bronchi) – because of this it is sometimes also called bronchial cancer
  • Mesothelioma – a rare cancer that affects the covering of the lung, called the pleura. It’s almost always caused by exposure to asbestos
  • Thoracic cancer – less common lung cancers can form outside the lungs and in the chest area. These are called ‘thoracic cancers’

Lung cancer journey

Find out more about the treatment journey for lung cancer, from diagnosis to survival.

Prostate cancer

Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men in the U.S., but early diagnosis and treatment can mean a positive outcome for many. Our teams of expert oncologists continually evaluate the latest prostate cancer treatments so we can offer the most up-to-date options to every patient without delay.

Only men have a prostate gland. It’s located underneath the bladder, around the urethra, and is about the shape and size of a walnut. It makes prostate fluid, one of the components of semen, and a protein called prostate specific antigen (PSA).

Prostate cancer happens when abnormal cells in the prostate multiply, causing a tumor. These cancerous cells can grow throughout the prostate and through the capsule surrounding the prostate. They can spread to other areas including bone and lymph nodes. This is known as secondary prostate cancer.

Prostate cancer can grow slowly and with no symptoms, so it can be difficult to detect. Most men without symptoms (low-grade prostate cancer) can live for many years without it spreading and becoming life-threatening, however, as you live longer, the cancer is more likely to cause more problems.

If prostate cancer is found before it has spread, it’s easier to treat. You may be offered a combination of therapies including surgery, radiation therapy and hormone therapy.

Prostate cancer journey

Find out more about the treatment journey for prostate cancer, from diagnosis to survival.

Skin cancer

Skin cancer is the most prevalent cancer type in the U.S. Roughly 20% of Americans will develop skin cancer before the age of 70.It is the growth of abnormal cells at an uncontrolled rate in the epidermis, or the outer skin layer.

There are two main types of skin cancer, and they’re categorized according to the cell the cancer starts from: melanoma and non-melanoma cancers.

What are non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC)?

NMSC develop among cells in the upper layers of the skin. They can occur anywhere on the skin, though they’re most commonly found on parts of the body that have experienced long-term sun exposure – like the head, face, neck, arms, legs, and back of the hands. While ultraviolet radiation (UVR) through tanning and inadequate sun protection are the largest risk factors of developing NMSC, those at higher risk also typically have fair skin, a history of ionizing radiation (x-rays, gamma rays), a suppressed immune system or a history of skin cancer.

Non-melanoma skin cancer journey

Learn more about diagnostic and treatment options for NMSC.

Treating locally advanced non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) and surrounding pre-cancerous skin

Skinviva™ is a GenesisCare branded program for the simultaneous management of locally advanced NMSC and surrounding pre-cancerous skin (often associated with extensive sun damage) utilizing modern radiation techniques.

  • The radiation therapy devices used for Skinviva can target diseased tissue more precisely than ever before. Our team creates personalized treatment plans for each patient to deliver the radiation dose where it is needed to avoid harming healthy cells and minimize side effects.
  • The technologies we use are also able to rapidly treat irregularly shaped surfaces, such as the scalp or extremities, as well as larger complex areas of skin.

Skinviva may be a good option for you if:

  • You have newly diagnosed, persistent or recurrent NMSC on irregularly shaped body regions, with surrounding precancerous skin changes.
  • Your NMSC is in an area not conducive to surgery, or where surgery might produce unsatisfactory functional or cosmetic results.

Speak with your healthcare provider about your situation and if you should consider consulting with a radiation oncologist about the Skinviva program.

Skinviva treatment journey

Learn more about Skinviva and radiation treatment options for NMSC.

What is melanoma?

Melanoma is a type of skin cancer that develops from melanocytes, which are cells that produce melanin and gives your skin color (or pigment). Melanin also plays an important role in protecting you from ultraviolet radiation and sunburn.

Melanoma is linked to sun exposure, but it can also affect areas of the body that aren’t often exposed to sun. In rare cases, it affects the skin that lines the nose, mouth and genitals. Those at highest risk have unprotected and excessive exposure to sun and ultraviolet radiation (UVR), a suppressed immune system, are fair skinned, have many moles or a skin cancer history. Additionally, melanoma can be caused by a genetic predisposition.

When melanoma cancer cells grow, a mark typically resembling a mole appears on the skin, usually brown or black in color. Melanoma can metastasize, or spread, to other parts of the body, including the lymph nodes, bone, lung, liver, and brain.

Melanoma skin cancer Journey

Learn more about diagnostic and treatment options for melanoma.

Treatment options for skin cancer

At GenesisCare, we offer the latest diagnostic tests and treatments for skin cancers, including surgery, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and advanced radiation therapies. Your care team can also give you advice about wellbeing and nutrition that you can follow throughout the course of your treatment and beyond.

We know from our experience that high-quality care means treating you as a person and not just your cancer. Our expert team will treat your disease in the best way possible, while offering as much personal support as you need.

References

  1. Skin Cancer Foundation. Skin Cancer Facts & Statistics. Available at: https://www.skincancer.org/skin-cancer-information/skin-cancer-facts/ [Accessed 01/17/2022]

Blood cancer

Blood cancers occur when your body produces larger, or smaller, numbers of blood cells that don’t function properly. These abnormal blood cells prevent your body from performing its normal functions, including fighting off infections, carrying oxygen around and preventing serious bleeding.

Types of blood cancers

Multiple myeloma

Multiple myeloma, or plasma cell myeloma, is a blood cancer that begins in the plasma cells of the bone marrow – where blood cells are made. It can start in more than one place in your body, including the spine, pelvis, ribs and skull.

Healthy plasma cells produce different antibodies that help your body fight various infections. If you have myeloma, the abnormal cells create an abnormal variety of antibodies that don’t work correctly. These are sometimes called a paraprotein or monoclonal antibody which multiply in an uncontrolled way.

The abnormal antibodies fill up your bone marrow and affect the normal production of other cells in the blood. This can lead to problems that may include anemia and a weakened immune system. Too many plasma cells can also damage your bones – causing them to be painful, thinner, and break more easily.

Multiple myeloma journey

Find out more about the treatment journey for multiple myeloma, from diagnostics to survivorship

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