Conditions

We’re here to get the best possible life outcomes for every cancer patient. We do that by combining the right clinical teams with innovative and effective treatments.

Cancers we treat

We work with nationally recognized consultants to design and deliver many cutting-edge treatments that are proven to be safe and effective for cancers in adults.  

There are over 200 different types of cancer, and each are treated in different ways. We personalize your care to you and your condition so it’s often a combination of therapies delivered in a seamless pathway from diagnosis to survivorship.

The main approaches to cancer care are:

  • Early detection and diagnosis is critical so cancers can be identified before they have spread elsewhere in the body and be treated more easily
  • Surgery to remove tumors (at our partner hospitals)
  • Radiotherapy to target and destroy cancer cells and some difficult-to-reach tumors
  • Systemic therapies – these include chemotherapy, hormone therapies and immunotherapies

You can read more about the types of cancer that we treat at GenesisCare below.

Brain and spinal cord cancers

The brain and spinal cord make up the central nervous system (CNS). The brain sends signals down the nerves of your spinal cord to the rest of the body to coordinate your muscles and internal organ functions.

Cancers develop when normal cells start to grow uncontrollably and form a mass known as a tumor. There are two main types of tumors that are found in the brain and spinal cord:

  • Primary tumor – cancerous cells that have originated in the brain/spinal cord and formed a tumor
  • Secondary tumor (metastasis) – a tumor that has originated in another part of the body and has spread to the brain/spinal cord

Secondary tumors in the brain and spinal cord are more common than primary tumors. It is estimated that approximately 35,000 patients will be diagnosed with a primary brain tumor each year in the U.S., and 140,000 patients with brain metastasis. Malignant (cancerous) brain and spinal tumors are relatively rare compared to other types of cancer.

Because they are located in such a critical area — cancers of the CNS are complicated to treat — which is why we work with teams of highly specialized clinicians to offer you the latest treatment plans.

The causes of these cancers are not fully understood, however, there are risk factors that can increase the likelihood of you developing them.

Having a risk factor for a disease doesn’t mean that you will definitely get it, but it does make it more likely. You may even have multiple risk factors for brain and spinal cord cancers and never get them.

The main risk factor for primary brain cancer is radiation. Radiation therapy for primary brain cancer is associated with a 55% increased risk of further brain tumors. Other risk factors include:

  •  Age – adult brain tumors can occur at any age, but are most common in people 50 to 70 years old
  •  Sex – there is a higher incidence of primary brain tumors in men compared to women
  •  Having certain genetic conditions, such as neurofibromatosis or Li-Fraumeni syndrome
  •  A family history of CNS tumors
  •  Having diabetes if you’re female
  •  Having another condition, such as Parkinson’s disease, HIV infection or AIDS

There are several early warning signs of cancers of the CNS, and these can vary from person to person. As the tumor grows, it takes up more space. Depending on its location, the growing tumor starts to increase pressure in your skull or on the nerves in close proximity, causing symptoms.

Common symptoms include:

  • Headaches
  • Tiredness and feeling drowsy
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Changes to vision, speech or hearing
  • Fits

Other symptoms you may experience can be related to the area of the brain your tumor has developed in.

Symptoms by brain area:

  • Frontal lobe – changes in personality and intellect, difficulty in walking, weakness of one side of the body, loss of smell, speech difficulties
  • Parietal lobe – difficulty speaking or understanding words, problems with writing, reading or calculations, difficulties in coordinating movements and finding your way around, numbness or weakness on one side of the body
  • Temporal lobe – seizures, feelings of fear or déjà vu, strange smells or blackouts, speech difficulties, memory problems
  • Occipital lobe – loss of vision to one eye which may not be noticeable at first and can sometimes be discovered during routine eye tests
  • Cerebellum – lack of coordination, slurred speech (dysarthria), unsteadiness, flickering involuntary movement of the eyes (nystagmus), vomiting, neck stiffness
  • Brain stem – unsteadiness and an uncoordinated walk, facial weakness, a one-sided smile or drooping eyelids, double vision, speaking and swallowing difficulties, vomiting or headache just after waking (this is rare)
  • Meninges – headaches sickness and problems with sight and movement
  • Pituitary gland – irregular periods, infertility, weight gain, lethargy, high blood pressure, diabetes, mood swings, enlarged hands and feet, tunnel vision

If your cancer started in the cranial nerves, you may experience:

  • Vision problems
  • Swallowing difficulties
  • Hearing loss in one or both ears
  • Facial paralysis, numbness or pain

Spine cancers usually cause symptoms on both sides of the body, such as numbness in both legs. This is different from most brain tumors which often only affect one side of the body. Spine cancers can also cause different symptoms, depending on where in the spinal cord the tumor is found:

  • Spinal cord tumors in the neck affect the arms and legs, as well as bowel and bladder function
  • Spinal cord tumors below the neck affect the legs, bowel and bladder

Sometimes these symptoms may be caused by other benign (non-cancerous) conditions. If you have one or more symptoms and are concerned, you should visit your doctor.

Our standard of care starts by offering the latest diagnostic tests and treatments for brain, spine and CNS cancers — including surgery, chemotherapy and advanced radiation therapy such as stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Your care team can also give you advice about well-being and nutrition that you can follow throughout the course of your treatment and beyond.

Our multidisciplinary teams are comprised of world-class physicians and expert support staff, who work together to ensure you always receive the best possible care that’s focused on you, not just your cancer.

Breast cancer

What is breast cancer?

Breast cancer is the abnormal growth of the cells lining the breast lobules or ducts. These cells grow uncontrollably and have the potential to spread to other parts of the body.

Breast cancer is the second most common cancer to affect women in the United States, but it can also affect men. It’s predominantly a disease that occurs among postmenopausal women, with 70% of all cases in women older than 55 years.

Fortunately, early diagnosis and advances in breast cancer treatment have enhanced the chances of survival.

Breast cancer may be broken down into two types: non-invasive and invasive.

Non-invasive

Non-invasive breast cancer is when the abnormal cells haven’t spread from their original location, this is typically in the milk producing glands or ducts. These tumors can’t usually be felt by your doctor and instead are most frequently identified by routine mammography. 90% of women diagnosed with non-invasive disease are ultimately cured. Types of non-invasive breast cancer include:

  • Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) – Cancer cells are found within the milk ducts of the breast. This is usually treated with surgery and breast radiation therapy.
  • Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) – Abnormal cells are found within breast lobules, but it’s not cancer. Although LCIS increases the risk of developing cancer, most women with this condition won’t go on to develop breast cancer. This is usually treated with surgery alone.

Invasive

Invasive forms of breast cancer have spread beyond the ducts into other nearby tissue of the breast. Infiltrating ductal carcinoma is an early invasive breast cancer and by far the most common form, accounting for over 90% of all cases. Other types of invasive breast cancer include:

  • Locally advanced breast cancer, where the cancer has spread to other areas nearby, such as the chest wall (including the skin and muscles of the chest) and lymph nodes. This is usually treated with a combination of surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy.
  • Secondary (metastatic or advanced) breast cancer, where cancer has spread to other parts of the body, such as the bones, liver or lungs. Secondary breast cancer is commonly treated with chemotherapy, immunotherapy, targeted therapy or hormone therapy.

The causes of breast cancer are not fully understood, however, there are risk factors that can increase the likelihood of you developing it.

The main risk factors are being a woman and aging – most breast cancers occur in women over 50 years old. Other risk factors include:

  • Genetic mutations and family history – some women inherit BRAC1 and BRAC2 gene mutations which increase your risk. You’re also more likely if there is a family history of breast cancer
  • Having early period before aged 12 and starting menopause after age 55
  • Having dense breasts
  • If you’ve had breast cancer before
  • Previous radiation therapy treatment to the chest or breasts before you’re 30 years old
  • If you took the drug diethylstilbestrol (DES) or your mother did while pregnant with you – DES is a drug that was given to women in the United States between 1940 and 1971 to prevent miscarriage

There are other lifestyle factors that can also slightly increase your risk. Some of these are things you may be able to change to lower your risk.

  • Not being physically active
  • Being overweight or obese after menopause
  • Taking forms of hormone replacement therapy for more than five years or some birth control pills
  • Having your first pregnancy before you’re 30 years old, not breastfeeding and never having a full-term pregnancy
  • Drinking alcohol

Having a risk factor for a disease doesn’t mean that you will definitely get it, but it makes it more likely. You might have many risks factors for breast cancer and never get it.

There are several early warning signs of breast cancer, and these can vary from person to person.

It’s important to remember that other, benign conditions may cause changes to the breasts, and very often these relate to a simple infection or harmless cyst.

The most common breast cancer symptom is a lump or mass.

Other breast cancer symptoms can include:

  • Changes in the size or shape of your breast
  • Changes to the color of your skin
  • Changes to how it feels—such as dimples
  • Fluid coming from one or both or your nipples
  • Redness or swelling to your breasts
  • Changes to the appearance of your nipples such as inversion or retraction – where it is turned inward
  • Crusting or a rash around your nipple
  • Persistent pain in your breast or armpit

We offer the latest diagnostic test and treatments for breast cancer as standard, including surgery, chemotherapy, advanced radiation therapy with organ-sparing techniques, such as deep inspiration breath hold. Your care team can also give you advice about wellbeing and nutrition that you can follow throughout the course of your treatment and beyond.

Our multidisciplinary teams are comprised of world-class physicians and expert support staff, who work together to ensure you always receive the best possible care that’s focused on you, not just your cancer.

Bladder cancer

What is bladder cancer?

Bladder cancer develops when the healthy cells that make up the lining of your bladder start to grow uncontrollably and form a tumor. This tumor can either stay in the lining or spread to nearby muscle.

The bladder is part of the urinary tract which is important in passing waste out of your body. Urine passes from the kidneys and down the ureters into the bladder before it is excreted through your urethra.

A lot of bladder cancers may also be called ‘transitional cell carcinomas’ – where the cancer originates in the transitional cells of your bladder. They can also be grouped depending on where in the bladder the tumor is found, the three types are:

  • Non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer: the most common type. It only affects the lining of the bladder
  • Muscle-invasive bladder cancer:when cancer spreads into muscle around the bladder. It’s then more likely to spread to other areas of the body (metastasize)
  • Advanced bladder cancer: where bladder cancer has already spread (metastasized) to other parts of the body

The causes of bladder cancer are not fully understood, however, there are risk factors that can increase the likelihood of you developing it.

Having a risk factor for a disease doesn’t mean that you will definitely get it, but it makes it more likely. You might have many risks factors for bladder cancer and never get it. You’re more likely to develop the condition if you:

  • Are a smoker
  • Are male – men are three times more likely to be diagnosed with bladder cancer than women in the U.S.
  • Are older – the risk of developing bladder cancer increases with age and it’s most common in people over 70
  • Have a close relative who has had bladder cancer
  • Already have a condition – such as Crohn’s disease, human papillomavirus (HPV) or diabetes
  • Have been exposed to workplace chemicals
  • Have chronic urinary tract infections (UTIs)

There are several early warning signs of bladder cancer, and these can vary from person to person. Common bladder cancer symptoms include:

  • Blood in your urine
  • Pain or burning when you urinate
  • A sudden need to urinate
  • Having to urinate more often – including during the night
  • Feeling a need to urinate but not being able to
  • Pain on one side of your lower back

Sometimes these symptoms might be caused by something else as they are similar to signs of non-cancerous conditions, such as a urine infection or enlarged prostate. If you have one or more of these bladder cancer symptoms and are concerned, you should see your physician in case they need to run some tests.

We offer the latest diagnostic tests and treatments for bladder cancer as standard, including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, brachytherapy and immunotherapies. Your care team can also give you advice about wellbeing and nutrition that you can follow throughout the course of your treatment and beyond.

Our multidisciplinary teams are comprised of world-class physicians and expert support staff, who work together to ensure you always receive the best possible care that’s focused on you, not just your cancer.

Cervical cancer

The cervix is the entrance to the uterus from the vagina. Cervical cancer develops when the cells of the cervix transform and start to grow at an uncontrollable rate. These abnormal cells accumulate to form a tumor.

Most cervical cancer cases are diagnosed in women under the age of 50 through their regular Pap smear. Cervical cancer is one of the most preventable forms of all cancers and because it is typically slow growing, it’s easily treated if caught early.

The causes of cervical cancer are unknown, although there are risk factors that can increase the likelihood of you developing it.

Having a risk factor for a disease doesn’t mean that you will definitely get it, but it does make it more likely. You may even have multiple risk factors for cervical cancer and never get it.

The main risk factor for cervical cancer is a virus known as human papillomavirus (HPV). It is passed from person to person during sex. Although there are many types of HPV, only a few cause cervical cancer. You are also more likely to develop cervical cancer if you:

  • Have had multiple sexual partners
  • First had sex at age 14 years old or under
  • Are a smoker
  • Have HIV or other sexually transmitted diseases
  • Have a family history of cervical cancer
  • Have previously had cancer of the vulva, vagina, kidney, or urinary tract
  • Are on the combined pill (containing synthetic versions of estrogen and progesterone)

You can reduce your risk of developing cervical cancer by receiving the HPV vaccine before you’re sexually active. You’re also half as likely to get cervical cancer if your partner is circumcised, because the risk of the HPV virus is much lower in circumcised men.

You may find that you have no symptoms in the early stages of cervical cancer. However, cervical cancer symptoms can include:

  • Irregular bleeding
  • Bleeding after menopause
  • Unusually long or heavy menstrual cycles
  • Pain or discomfort during sex
  • Bleeding after sex
  • Discharge from the vagina that smells unpleasant
  • Pain in your pelvis

After an abnormal pap smear, a biopsy may be performed to help determine a diagnosis. We offer the latest diagnostic tests and treatments for cervical cancers—including surgery, chemotherapy and advanced radiation therapy such as high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Your care team can also give you advice about well-being and nutrition that you can follow throughout the course of your treatment and beyond.

We know from our experience that high-quality care means treating you as a person and not just your cancer. Our expert team will treat your disease in the best way possible, while offering as much personal support as you need.

Colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer, sometimes called colon cancer or bowel cancer, is the fourth most common cancer type in the U.S with an estimated 145,000 new cases in 2019. Our teams of expert oncologists continually evaluate the latest colorectal cancer treatments so we can offer the most up-to-date options to every patient without delay.

The colon and rectum are part of your digestive system. The colon is the first four to five feet of the large intestine (also called the large bowel) and the rectum is the last five inches that connects the colon to the anus.

Sometimes small growths of tissue known as polyps can form in the lining of the colon and rectum. These look like small spots and they may become cancerous over time. Colorectal cancer typically grows from these polyps slowly over a period of years.

The causes of colorectal cancer are unknown, although there are some risk factors that can increase the likelihood of you developing it.

Having a risk factor for a disease doesn’t mean that you will definitely get it, but it does make it more likely. You may even have multiple risk factors for colorectal cancer and never get it. However, you are more prone to get colorectal cancer if you:

  • Are older
  • Have polyps (growths) on the inner wall of your colon or rectum
  • Have a family history of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) or hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC)
  • Are overweight
  • Drink or smoke heavily
  • Have a family history of colorectal cancer or colorectal polyps
  • Have an inflammatory bowel disease, such as Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis
  • Regularly eat red or processed meats
  • Have a diet which is high in fat and low in fiber
  • Have a medical condition, such diabetes or gallstones

While you may have no symptoms in the early stages of colorectal cancer, as it grows you may experience different symptoms depending on your cancer’s size and location in the intestine. Colorectal cancer symptoms can include:

  • Changes to your usual bowel habits, such as constipation or diarrhea
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Feeling as if you haven’t emptied your bowel after a bowel movement
  • Light or dark blood in your stool
  • Loss of appetite or weight loss
  • Pain during bowel movements
  • Stomach pains

Having one or more of these symptoms doesn’t mean you have colorectal cancer, but it’s best to ask your doctor for advice. The sooner your cancer is detected, the better the chances are of it being successfully treated.

Our standard of care starts by offering the latest diagnostic tests and treatments for colorectal cancers — including surgery, chemotherapy radiation therapy and targeted therapies. Your care team can also give you advice about well-being and nutrition that you can follow throughout the course of your treatment and beyond.

We know from our experience that high-quality care means treating you as a person and not just your cancer. Our expert team will treat your disease in the best way possible, while offering as much personal support as you need.

Esophageal cancer

Esophageal cancer is relatively rare in the U.S., accounting for only 1% of all cancers diagnosed. It’s three times more common in men and mostly affects individuals over the age of 65. Our teams of specialist oncologists continually evaluate the latest esophageal cancer treatments so we can offer the most up-to-date options to every patient without delay.

The esophagus is part of the digestive system and carries food from the mouth to the stomach. It is 10 to 13 inches long, and less than an inch wide at its smallest point.

Esophageal cancer develops when cells in the esophagus become abnormal and grow at an uncontrollable rate. These cancerous cells can accumulate into a tumor and this may occur in any part of the esophagus (upper, middle or lower).

Esophageal cancer may be broken down into two types, depending on the cells in which the cancer originated. These are:

  • Esophageal adenocarcinoma– the cancer starts in the mucus glands of the esophagus. This usually develops in the lower part of the esophagus, at the junction with the stomach
  • Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma– the cancer starts in the cells that make up the inner lining of the esophagus. This often occurs in the upper and middle part of the esophagus

The causes of esophageal cancer are unknown, however, there are some risk factors that can increase the likelihood of you developing it.

Having a risk factor for a disease doesn’t mean that you will definitely get it, but it does make it more likely. You might have many risks factors for esophageal cancer and never get it. You are more prone to develop esophageal cancer if you:

  • Are male
  • Are older
  • Are overweight or obese
  • Drink excessive amounts of alcohol
  • Smoke
  • Have precancerous changes in your esophageal cells, such as a condition called Barrett’s esophagus
  • Have acid reflux or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)
  • Have a diet which is high in fat and low in fruits and vegetables

The first signs of esophageal cancer can be difficult to spot. You may experience:

  • Feeling tired or shortness of breath
  • Indigestion or heart burn that doesn’t go away
  • Nausea or vomiting which is related to eating
  • Pain or difficulty when swallowing
  • Loss of appetite or unexplained weight loss

Having one or more of these symptoms doesn’t mean you have esophageal cancer but it’s best to ask your primary care physician for advice. The sooner your cancer is detected, the better the chances are of it being successfully treated.

We offer the latest diagnostic tests and treatments for esophageal cancers as standard, including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy and targeted therapies. Your care team can also give you advice about well-being and nutrition that you can follow throughout the course of your treatment and beyond.

We know from our experience that high-quality care means treating you as a person and not just your cancer. Our expert team will treat your disease in the best way possible, while offering as much personal support as you need.

Head and neck cancer

Head and neck cancers are a broad category of cancers that are found in the head and neck region. They’re named after the location where the cancerous cells originate, and they usually begin in skin cells called squamous cells that line moist, mucus-producing surfaces.

 

Head and neck cancers can be found in the:

  • Mouth—including the roof, tongue, gums, and lips
  • Throat
  • Voice box (larynx)
  • Nose and nasal cavity
  • Salivary glands
  • Sinuses (the spaces in between the bones of your face)
  • Middle ear

Head and neck cancers are relatively uncommon in the U.S., accounting for about 4% of all cancer cases. Around 65,000 people develop head and neck cancer in the U.S. each year. If detected at an early stage, head and neck cancers are often treatable.

The causes of head and neck cancer are unknown, although there are some risk factors that can increase the likelihood of you developing each type.

Having a risk factor for a disease doesn’t mean that you will definitely get it, but it does make it more likely. You may even have many risk factors for head and neck cancer and never get it.

The main risk factors for most head and neck cancers are drinking excessive amounts of alcohol and through smoking — such as cigarettes, pipes, or even second-hand exposure.

You’re also more likely to develop some head and neck cancers if you:

  • Are male
  • Are older
  • Have an infection, such as the Human Papillomavirus (HPV)
  • Have a family history of head and neck cancers
  • Are overweight or obese
  • Eat a diet that is high in salt-cured meats, or low in fruits and vegetables
  • Have been exposed to dust or workplace chemicals

The signs of head and neck cancer vary depending on where your cancer is. In some instances, the first symptoms may be difficult to spot. You may experience:

  • Lumps or swelling
  • Pain
  • Fatigue and weakness
  • Sore throat
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Breathing difficulties or breathlessness
  • Headaches or double vision
  • A change in your voice or difficulty speaking
  • Eating difficulties, such as finding it hard to open your mouth or swallow
  • Changes to your ears, such as constant ringing (tinnitus), fluid, earache, or loss of hearing
  • Changes to your nose, including a reduced sense of smell, nosebleeds, or discharge from the nose

These head and neck cancer symptoms may be caused by other, non-cancerous conditions, but it’s best to speak to your primary care physician for advice if you have any concerns. The sooner your cancer is detected, the better the chance of it being successfully treated.

Our standard of care starts by offering the latest diagnostic tests and treatments for head and neck cancers – including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy and targeted therapies. Your care team can also give you advice about well-being and nutrition that you can follow throughout the course of your treatment and beyond.

We know from our experience that high-quality care means treating you as a person and not just your cancer. Our expert team will treat your disease in the best way possible, while offering as much personal support as you need.

Kidney cancer

Kidney cancer occurs when cells in the kidney start to grow uncontrollably. These abnormal cells accumulate into a mass, known as a tumor.

The kidneys are a pair of organs that are essential to your urinary system. Their job is to filter waste products and extra water from the blood while producing urine.

Most people have two kidneys, and usually, kidney cancer only affects one of them. The most common type of kidney cancer in adults is renal cell carcinoma (RCC). It starts in the small tubes of the kidneys. There are three main types of RCC, these are:

  • Clear cell, which is the most common
  • Chromophobe
  • Papillary

In the U.S., kidney cancer is the sixth most common cancer type in men and the eighth in women, however, it rarely occurs in people under the age of 55. Children are more likely to develop a kind of kidney cancer called Wilms’ tumor.

If it’s diagnosed early enough, and it hasn’t spread, kidney cancer is often treatable.

The causes of kidney cancer are unknown, although there are some risk factors that can increase the likelihood of you developing it.

Having a risk factor for a disease doesn’t mean that you will definitely get it, but it does make it more likely. You may even have multiple risk factors for kidney cancer and never get it.

However, you’re more likely to develop kidney cancers if you:

  • Are very overweight or obese
  • Are older
  • Smoke
  • Have a close family member who has had kidney cancer
  • Have had dialysis for kidney disease
  • Have previously had radiation therapy for testicular cancer
  • Have high blood pressure
  • Have an inherited condition, such as Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome
  • Have a medical condition, such as chronic kidney disease or sickle cell disease (SCD)

Some signs of kidney cancer are more obvious than others, these include:

  • Blood in your urine (hematuria)
  • A lump in your kidney area, found in the middle part of your back

Other kidney cancer symptoms include:

  • Pain in the side of your lower back or abdomen
  • Fatigue
  • High blood pressure (hypertension)
  • High temperature and sweating
  • Swelling in your ankle or leg (edema)
  • Sudden, unexplained weight loss
  • Swollen neck glands

Having one or more of these kidney cancer symptoms doesn’t mean you have cancer, as they may be caused by other, non-cancerous conditions. It’s best to speak to your primary care physician for advice if you have any concerns. The sooner your cancer is detected, the better the chances are of it being successfully treated.

We offer the latest diagnostic tests and treatments for kidney cancers as standard, including surgery, radiation therapy, immunotherapies and targeted therapies. Your care team can also give you advice about well-being and nutrition that you can follow throughout the course of your treatment and beyond.

We know from our experience that high-quality care means treating you as a person and not just your cancer. Our expert team will treat your disease in the best way possible, while offering as much personal support as you need.

Liver cancer

Your liver is a large organ which filters your blood. It also makes important proteins, metabolizes fats, and stores carbohydrates which the body uses for energy.

Cancer occurs when the cells in the body start to grow uncontrollably. These abnormal cells accumulate to form a tumor. Liver cancer can be categorized into two types, primary and secondary.

  • Primary liver cancer – This is when the cancerous cells originate in the liver. The most common type of primary liver cancer is hepatocellular carcinoma. More rare types of liver cancer include intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and hepatoblastoma.
  • Secondary liver cancer – Cancer that has spread (metastasized) to the liver from another part of the body is called secondary liver cancer. This means it’s an advanced cancer. Secondary liver cancer is much more common than primary liver cancer, and is named after the area of the body that the cancerous cells originated from.

In the U.S., primary liver cancer affects about 40,000 people each year, with this number increasing annually. Men are also around three times more likely to get primary liver cancer than women.

The causes of liver cancer are unknown, although there are some risk factors that can increase the likelihood of you developing it.

Having a risk factor for a disease doesn’t mean that you will definitely get it, but it does make it more likely. You may even have multiple risk factors for liver cancer and never get it.

However, many liver cancer cases are related to chronic viral infections, particularly hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV).

You’re also more likely to develop liver cancers if you:

  • Are male
  • Are older
  • Drink excessive amounts of alcohol
  • Have a type of scarring of the liver called cirrhosis, which can be caused by hepatitis or alcohol abuse
  • Are obese
  • Are diabetic
  • Have an inherited liver condition, such as hemochromatosis or Wilson’s disease
  • Eat foods that have been affected by aflatoxins (molds that grow on crops when they’re not stored properly)

Most people don’t have any liver cancer symptoms during its early stages. As the cancer grows, you may experience:

  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Loss of appetite
  • Pains in your upper abdomen
  • Lump in your liver area, which is on your right side below the rib cage
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Weakness and fatigue
  • Swelling in your abdomen
  • Jaundice, characterized by the yellow discoloration of your skin and the whites of your eyes
  • White, chalky stools

Having one or more of these liver cancer symptoms doesn’t mean you have cancer, as they may be caused by other conditions. It’s best to speak to your primary care physician if you have any concerns. The sooner your cancer is detected, the better the chances are of it being successfully treated.

Our standard of care starts by offering the latest diagnostic tests and treatments for liver cancer — including chemotherapy, targeted therapies and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Our latest-generation systems deliver highly targeted radiation, for effective tumor treatments with fewer side effects.

At GenesisCare, we understand what it takes to achieve the best possible life outcomes, so we go even further by providing the personal support you need. After all, we’re treating you — not just your cancer.

Lung cancer

Lung cancer is the second most common type of cancer in the U.S., with over 200,000 new cases each year. Our teams of expert oncologists and pulmonologists continually evaluate the latest lung cancer treatments so we can offer the most up-to-date options to every patient without delay.

The lungs are the main organs for breathing and are part of the respiratory system that includes the nose, mouth, windpipe and airways to each lung. Lung cancer develops when cells in the body start to grow uncontrollably and accumulate to form a cancerous tumor in the tissue of one or both of the lungs.

Lung cancer can be categorized into two types, primary and secondary.

Primary lung cancer

This is when the cancerous cells originate in the lung. Primary lung cancer can be further split into two groups:

Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)
This is the most common type of primary lung cancer – about 9 out of 10 cases.

Types of non-small cell lung cancer include:

  • Adenocarcinoma – starts in the mucus and affects the smaller airways
  • Squamous cell carcinoma – mainly affects the cells that line the tubes into the lungs. It tends to grow in the center of the lung and is usually caused by smoking
  • Large cell carcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma – cancer affecting large round cells

Small cell lung cancer (SCLC)
This is much less common and it mainly affects smokers.

SCLC tends to start in the middle of the lungs and usually spreads more quickly than NSCLC. Types of small cell lung cancer include:

  • Small cell carcinoma
  • Mixed small cell/large cell carcinoma

Secondary lung cancer

Cancer that has spread (metastasized) to the lung from another part of the body is called secondary lung cancer. This means it’s an advanced cancer.

Less common lung cancers include:

  • Tracheal cancer – a type of lung cancer which starts in the trachea (windpipe) or one of its two branches (the bronchi) – because of this it is sometimes also called bronchial cancer
  • Mesothelioma – a rare cancer that affects the covering of the lung, called the pleura. It’s almost always caused by exposure to asbestos
  • Thoracic cancer – less common lung cancers can form outside the lungs and in the chest area. These are called ‘thoracic cancers’

The majority of lung cancer cases are caused by smoking, either you smoking or being exposed to second-hand smoke. In some instances, lung cancer can develop in people who’ve never smoked or are not exposed to second-hand smoke – the underlying causes here are not clear.

There are a number of known factors that increase your risk of developing lung cancer.

Having a risk factor for a disease doesn’t mean that you will definitely get it, but it makes it more likely. You might have many risks factors for lung cancer and never get it.

You’re more likely to develop lung cancers if you:

  • Are over 65
  • Smoke or are exposed to second-hand smoke
  • Have a personal or family history of lung cancer
  • Have previously had radiation therapy to your chest
  • Work with asbestos or other chemicals – such as arsenic, chromium and nickel
  • Are exposed to radon gas – this is produced by the natural breakdown of substances in soil. Unsafe levels of radon can sometimes accumulate in homes

Most people don’t have any signs of lung cancer when it’s in its early stages. As the cancer grows, you may experience:

  • A persistent cough that is progressively worse
  • Coughing up blood
  • Hoarse voice
  • Regular or persistent chest infections
  • Wheezing
  • Shortness of breath
  • Breathing or swallowing difficulties
  • Fatigue
  • Weight loss

Having one or more lung cancer symptoms doesn’t mean you have cancer, as they may be caused by other conditions. It’s best to speak to your primary care physician if you have any concerns. The sooner your cancer is detected, the better the chance of it being successfully treated.

We offer the latest diagnostic tests and treatments for lung cancer as standard, including advanced radiation therapies such as high-dose rate brachytherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Our latest-generation systems deliver highly targeted radiation, for effective tumor treatments with fewer side effects.

At GenesisCare, we understand what it takes to achieve the best possible life outcomes and go a little further to provide it. After all, we’re treating you — not just your cancer.

Multiple myeloma

Multiple myeloma, or plasma cell myeloma, is a blood cancer that begins in the plasma cells of the bone marrow – where blood cells are made. It can start in more than one place in your body, including the spine, pelvis, ribs and skull.

Healthy plasma cells produce different antibodies that help your body fight various infections. If you have myeloma, the abnormal cells create an abnormal variety of antibodies that don’t work correctly. These are sometimes called a paraprotein or monoclonal antibody which multiply in an uncontrolled way.

The abnormal antibodies fill up your bone marrow and affect the normal production of other cells in the blood. This can lead to problems that may include anemia and a weakened immune system. Too many plasma cells can also damage your bones – causing them to be painful, thinner, and break more easily.

The cause of most myelomas is not known, although there are some factors that increase your risk of developing it.

Having a risk factor for a disease doesn’t mean that you will definitely get it, but it does make it more likely. You may even have a variety of risk factors for multiple myeloma and never get it.

However, you’re more likely to develop multiple myeloma if you:

  • Are a black person (black people are affected twice as often as white or Asian people)
  • Are over 75 years old
  • Are overweight or obese
  • Have a family history of myeloma or monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS)
  • Have a weakened immune system, which may be due to receiving medication following a transplant or having a condition such as HIV
  • Have an autoimmune condition such as lupus
  • Have previously received to radiation therapy
  • Have certain genetic conditions such as Gaucher disease

Not everybody has symptoms in the early stages of multiple myeloma. The cancer grows slowly, so it may take several years before you notice any warning signs. As it develops, you may experience:

  • Bone pain in your ribs or lower back
  • Breathlessness
  • Changes in your bowel habits
  • Fatigue
  • Feeling very thirsty or sick
  • Fever and repeated infections
  • Kidney problems
  • Loss of appetite
  • Swelling in your ankles
  • Unusual bruising of the skin and bleeding

Having one or more of these multiple myeloma symptoms doesn’t mean you have cancer, as they may be caused by other conditions. It’s best to speak to your primary care physician if you have any concerns. The sooner your cancer is detected, the better the chances are of it being successfully treated.

Our standard of care starts by offering the latest diagnostic tests and treatments for multiple myeloma — including chemotherapy, targeted therapies, and radiation therapy. As part of a successful global company, we have access to world-class expertise and invest in the latest technology and treatments that have been proven to make a difference.

At GenesisCare, we understand what it takes to achieve the best possible life outcomes, so we go even further by providing the personal support you need. After all, we’re treating you — not just your cancer.

Ovarian cancer

The two ovaries are part of the female reproductive system. They produce the female sex hormones estrogen and progesterone which control your menstrual cycle, and an egg each month during your fertile years.

Ovarian cancer develops when cells in the ovary grow and multiply in an uncontrolled way. They accumulate to form a tumor which – if not treated – can spread to other areas of the body. At an early stage, ovarian cancer can be difficult to diagnose.

The type of ovarian cancer you have depends on the kind of cell your cancer started in. The three main types of ovarian cancer are:

  • Epithelial tumors – these begin in the epithelial cells that cover the ovaries. Around 90% of all ovarian cancers are epithelial tumors
  • Stromal tumors – this is a less common type of ovarian cancer which starts in the cells that produce hormones. These tumors are generally diagnosed quicker than other types of ovarian cancers, and they make up about 7% of ovarian cancer cases
  • Germ cell tumors – these begin in the egg-producing cells of the ovaries. Germ cell tumors are a rare kind of ovarian cancer and most often occur in younger women

We don’t know what causes ovarian cancer. However, there are some factors that increase your risk of developing it.

Having a risk factor for a disease doesn’t mean that you will definitely get it, but it makes it more likely. You might have many risks factors for ovarian cancer and never get it. You’re more likely to develop ovarian cancer if you:

  • Are over 60 years old
  • Have a family history of ovarian or breast cancer
  • Have the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation
  • Have previously had breast cancer
  • Have received hormone replacement therapy (HRT) or tamoxifen (breast cancer therapy)
  • Have endometriosis
  • Are overweight

You may be less at risk if you:

  • Are taking the contraceptive pill
  • Have had children
  • Breastfed your children

It can be difficult to recognize the signs of ovarian cancer, it may go undetected until it has spread to your pelvis or abdomen. As it develops you may experience:

  • A bloated feeling or swollen abdomen
  • Feeling very full when eating
  • Urinating more frequently
  • Fatigue
  • Pain or discomfort in your pelvis or abdomen
  • Unexplained weight loss

Having one or more of these ovarian cancer symptoms doesn’t mean you’ll have the condition, as these changes can be caused by other illnesses such as irritable bowel syndrome. It’s best to speak to your primary care physician if you have any concerns. The sooner ovarian cancer is detected, the better the chance of it being successfully treated.

We offer the latest ovarian cancer diagnostic tests and treatments for as standard, including surgery, radiation therapy, targeted therapy and hormone therapies. As part of a successful global company, we have access to world-class expertise and invest in the latest technology and treatments that have been proven to make a difference.

At GenesisCare, we understand what it takes to achieve the best possible life outcomes and go a little further to provide it. After all, we’re treating you — not just your cancer.

Pancreatic cancer

The pancreas is a thin, lumpy organ that lies between the stomach and spine in your upper abdomen. It’s about six inches long and is joined by the pancreatic duct to the first part of the small bowel.

The pancreas has two main functions in the digestive system:

  • It makes hormones, including insulin to control the amount of sugar in the blood
  • It produces enzymes, which help break down food so the body can digest it

Cancer of the pancreas begins in the cells that line the pancreatic duct and can spread into the rest of the pancreas before moving into surrounding blood vessels and nerves. Most pancreatic cancers start in the exocrine cells that produce the digestive enzymes. Cancers from the endocrine, hormone-producing cells are less common.

In some cases, pancreatic cancer can spread to other parts of the body through your blood and lymphatic systems. Your tumor may also grow and obstruct the bile duct, which can cause jaundice.

We don’t know what causes cancer of the pancreas, however, there are some factors that increase your risk of developing it.

Having a risk factor for a disease doesn’t mean that you will definitely get it, but it makes it more likely. You might have many risks factors for pancreatic cancer and never get it. You’re more likely to develop pancreatic cancer if you:

  • Are older – most people who are diagnosed with pancreatic cancer are over 65
  • Are very overweight
  • Eat processed meat
  • Smoke – one in three cases are linked to cigarettes, cigars or chewing tobacco
  • Drink a lot of alcohol (which can lead to chronic pancreatitis)
  • Have or have previously had certain medical conditions – such as chronic pancreatitis, stomach ulcers, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, and diabetes
  • Have an inherited disease – including Lynch or Peutz-Jeghers syndrome
  • Have two or more relatives who have previously had pancreatic cancer

Diagnosing pancreatic cancer can be difficult as many symptoms don’t appear until quite late. The earliest symptoms pancreatic cancer may include:

  • Back pain
  • Jaundice – this is characterized by the yellow discoloration of your skin and the whites of your eyes
  • Stomach pains
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Extreme tiredness

You may also experience:

  • Blood clots
  • Changes in your regular bowel movements – such as constipation or diarrhea
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • High temperature or a fever
  • Indigestion

Having one or more of these pancreatic cancer symptoms doesn’t mean you have the condition, as these changes can be caused by other illnesses such as irritable bowel syndrome. It’s best to speak to your primary care physician if you have any concerns. The sooner pancreatic cancer is detected, the better the chance of it being successfully treated.

We offer the latest diagnostic tests and treatments for cancer of the pancreas as standard, including surgery, chemotherapy, targeted therapies and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Our latest-generation systems deliver highly targeted radiation, for effective tumor treatments with fewer side effects.

At GenesisCare, we understand what it takes to achieve the best possible life outcomes and go a little further to provide it. After all, we’re treating you — not just your cancer.

Prostate cancer

Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men in the U.S., but early diagnosis and treatment can mean a positive outcome for many. Our teams of expert oncologists continually evaluate the latest prostate cancer treatments so we can offer the most up-to-date options to every patient without delay.

Only men have a prostate gland. It’s located underneath the bladder, around the urethra, and is about the shape and size of a walnut. It makes prostate fluid, one of the components of semen, and a protein called prostate specific antigen (PSA).

Prostate cancer happens when abnormal cells in the prostate multiply, causing a tumor. These cancerous cells can grow throughout the prostate and through the capsule surrounding the prostate. They can spread to other areas including bone and lymph nodes. This is known as secondary prostate cancer.

Prostate cancer can grow slowly and with no symptoms, so it can be difficult to detect. Most men without symptoms (low-grade prostate cancer) can live for many years without it spreading and becoming life-threatening, however, as you live longer, the cancer is more likely to cause more problems.

If prostate cancer is found before it has spread, it’s easier to treat. You may be offered a combination of therapies including surgery, radiation therapy and hormone therapy.

The exact cause of prostate cancer isn’t known, although there are some factors that increase your risk of developing it.

Having a risk factor for a disease doesn’t mean that you will definitely get it, but it does make it more likely. You may even have multiple risk factors for prostate cancer and never get it.

However, you’re more likely to develop prostate cancer if you:

  • Are older – prostate cancer is rare before the age of 40, but increases after age 50
  • Are black – black men carry a greater risk of prostate cancer
  • Have a strong family history of prostate cancer
  • Have specific genetic conditions which are also associated with breast cancer and ovarian cancer in women (BRCA mutations)
  • Are obese

Prostate cancer does not always cause symptoms. Some men may experience:

  • Difficulty urinating – such as slow starting, a reduced flow, needing to urinate more frequently or urgently and with some pain
  • Hematuria (blood in your urine)
  • Blood in your semen
  • Lower back pain
  • Pain in your testicles
  • Unexplained weight loss

Having these prostate cancer symptoms does not mean you have cancer, some of these changes in older men can often be a sign of an enlarged prostate which is not a serious condition. You should always seek medical advice if you have any concerns or display one or more of these symptoms. Diagnosing prostate cancer before it has spread will increase the likelihood of it being successfully treated.

Your primary care physician can check for prostate cancer using a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test, digital rectal exam (DRE) and biopsy. Early detection and diagnosis of prostate cancer is critical, as it can be more easily treated before it has spread elsewhere in the body.

We offer the latest diagnostic tests and treatments for prostate cancer as standard, including surgery, chemotherapy, hormone therapy and advanced radiation therapy such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Our latest-generation systems deliver highly targeted radiation, for effective tumor treatments with fewer side effects.

At GenesisCare, we understand what it takes to achieve the best possible life outcomes, so we go even further by providing the personal support you need. After all, we’re treating you – not just your cancer.

Skin cancer

Skin cancer occurs when your skin cells acquire abnormal changes and grow at an uncontrolled rate. There are two main types and they’re categorized according to the cell the cancer starts from, these are melanoma and non-malignant melanoma. Skin cancer is the most common cancer type in the U.S. and one in five Americans will develop it before they are 70 years old.

What is melanoma?

Melanoma is a type of skin cancer that develops from cells called melanocytes. These produce melanin which gives your skin its color (or pigment). Melanin also plays an important role in protecting you from ultraviolet radiation and sunburn.

Melanoma is linked to sun exposure, but it can also affect areas of the body that aren’t often exposed to sun. In rare cases, it affects the skin that lines the nose, mouth and genitals.

When melanoma cancer cells grow, a mark appears on the skin, usually brown or black in color. Melanoma can spread to other parts of the body, including the lymph nodes, bone, lung, liver and brain. When cancer spreads it is known as ‘metastatic’ or secondary cancer

The most common type of melanoma is superficial spreading melanoma. When it starts, it spreads across the skin – not down into the lower layers. It is easier to treat if it’s caught early. Other types include, nodular, lentigo maligna, acral lentiginous, and amelanotic melanoma.

What are non-melanoma skin cancers?

Non-melanoma skin cancers develop among cells in the upper layers of the skin. They can occur anywhere on the skin, though it’s most commonly found on parts of the body that have experienced long-term sun exposure – like the head, face, neck, arms, legs and back of the hands.

The two most common types of non-malignant melanoma skin cancer are:

  • Basal cell carcinomas (BCC) – Basal cell carcinoma begins in the basal cells of the skin. These cells are found at the bottom of the epidermis skin layer and replace new cells once the older ones have died off. BCC’s usually stay in one place but they can sometimes spread to other nearby areas. In rare instances they spread to lymph nodes or other sites in the body. Basal cell carcinomas are the most common type of non-malignant melanoma skin cancer.
  • Squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) – Squamous cell carcinoma is a cancer that develops in the squamous cells that make up the middle and outer layers of the skin. Although they’re not usually life-threatening, some high-risk squamous cell carcinomas have the potential to spread to lymph nodes or distant sites in the body. Treatment may be less successful if other parts of the body have been affected.

The leading cause of skin cancer is UV radiation. This may be from the sunlight or in the lights used in tanning beds).

There are several known factors for skin cancer. Having a risk factor for a disease doesn’t mean that you will develop it, but it makes it more likely. You might have many risks factors for skin cancer and never get it.

You’re more likely to develop skin cancers if you:

  • Are older
  • Have a family history or personal history of melanoma
  • Have a rare type of birthmark – known as giant congenital melanocytic naevus
  • Spend lots of time in the sun
  • Have fair skin which burns easily
  • Have blonder or red hair, or blue or green eyes
  • Have reduced immunity or HIV
  • Have moles – the more moles you have, the higher the risk
  • Have another medical condition – such as Chron’s disease, ulcerative colitis or sarcoidosis

Melanoma

The first sign of melanoma cancer is often a new spot on the skin, or the change in size, shape or color of an existing mole. You may find that the spot is also bleeding, painful, inflamed or itchy.

A good way to remember the warning signs for melanoma is the A-B-C-D-E method:

  • A is for asymmetrical – is the mole or spot irregularly shaped?
  • B is for border – is the border jagged?
  • C is for color – is the color uneven?
  • D is for diameter – is it larger than the size of a pea?
  • E is for evolving – has it changed during the past few weeks?

Non-melanoma skin cancer

Non-melanoma skin cancer symptoms include:

  • A pink or red spot that doesn’t heal
  • A scaly area of skin that doesn’t heal
  • Smooth lumps with a pearly appearance
  • Red or dark coloured spots or sores that don’t go away after one month
  • Red or dark coloured spots or sores that are painful, itchy or bleeding
  • Broken skin which doesn’t improve within one month
  • Red patches on your skin

Having one or more of these skin cancer symptoms doesn’t mean you have cancer, as they may be caused by other, benign (non-cancerous) conditions. It’s best to speak to your primary care physician for advice if you have any concerns. The sooner your cancer is detected, the better the chance of it being successfully treated.

We offer the latest diagnostic tests and treatments for skin cancers as standard, including surgery, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and advanced radiation therapies such as VMAT. Your care team can also give you advice about wellbeing and nutrition that you can follow throughout the course of your treatment and beyond.

We know from our experience that high-quality care means treating you as a person and not just your cancer. Our expert team will treat your disease in the best way possible, while offering as much personal support as you need.

Stomach cancer

In the U.S., stomach cancer is more common in men than women and about two thirds of people diagnosed are 65 or older.

Stomach cancer, or gastric cancer, typically begins in the cells that line the stomach wall or inside the stomach itself. The cells acquire abnormal changes and start to grow uncontrollably to form a tumor. This process tends to be quite slow. Stomach cancers rarely cause symptoms in the early stages and can go undetected for several years. As the tumor grows, it may start to spread to nearby organs, such as the liver and pancreas.

The most common type of stomach cancer is an adenocarcinoma, this is when the tumor originates from the cells lining the stomach that produce mucus and stomach acid. Other stomach cancers include lymphomas (in the stomach wall) and leiomyosarcomas (in smooth muscle of the stomach). Stomach cancers can also be named according to their location, for example, if the tumor is located at the place where the top of the stomach meets the bottom of the esophagus, you may hear it be described as gastroesophageal junction cancer.

The causes of stomach cancer are unknown, however, there are some risk factors that can increase the likelihood of you developing it.

Having a risk factor for a disease doesn’t mean that you will definitely get it, but it makes it more likely. You might have many risks factors for stomach cancer and never get it.

You’re more likely to develop stomach cancers if you:

  • Are male
  • Are older
  • Are overweight or obese
  • Have a history of gastrointestinal reflux disease (GERD)
  • Eat a lot of processed meat
  • Smoke
  • Have been infected with a bacteria called Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)
  • Have a diet that is high in salt or low in fruit and vegetables
  • Have been exposed to certain workplace certain chemicals – for example if you work in the rubber production industry or with asbestos
  • Have a family history of stomach cancer

Cancer of the stomach is often detected late as the signs may not be obvious. More advanced stomach cancer symptoms may include:

  • Acidity and heartburn
  • Anemia – caused by bleeding in the stomach
  • Feeling bloated eating
  • Indigestion
  • Loss of appetite and weight loss
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Stomach pains or swelling
  • Swallowing difficulties
  • Trapped wind

Having one or more of these symptoms doesn’t mean you have cancer, as they may be caused by other conditions. It’s best to speak to your primary care physician for advice if you have any concerns. The sooner your cancer is detected, the better the chance of treating it successfully.

We offer the latest diagnostic tests and treatments including stomach cancer surgery, chemotherapy radiation therapy, and targeted therapies. Your care team can also give you advice about wellbeing and nutrition that you can follow throughout the course of your treatment and beyond.

We know from our experience that high-quality care means treating you as a person and not just your cancer. Our expert team will treat your disease in the best way possible, while offering as much personal support as you need.

Testicular cancer

Testicular cancer is rare compared to other cancer types, however, it is the most common cancer in American males between the ages of 15 and 35. Unlike prostate cancer, testicular cancer is uncommon in older men.

Testicular cancer occurs well the cells in the testicles (testes) start to grow uncontrollably and accumulate into a mass known as a tumor. More than 90% of testicular cancers originate in the germ cells, which produce sperm. The two main types of germ cell tumors in the testicle are seminomas and non-seminomas, and there are further subtypes to each of these. Despite the numerous different kinds of testicular cancer, all men who develop testicular cancer are born with an abnormality on their 12th chromosome.

When detected early, testicular cancer is easily curable. Treatment usually involves surgery to remove the testicle, but you may also need chemotherapy or radiation therapy.

We’re not sure exactly what causes testicular cancer, however, there are some known factors that increase your risk of developing the condition.

Having a risk factor for a disease doesn’t mean that you will definitely get it, but it makes it more likely. You might have many risks factors for testicular cancer and never get it.

Testicular cancer is more common in men with undescended testicles – a condition known as cryptorchidism. Usually, babies are born with their testicles already in the scrotum but for some, the testicles can remain in the abdomen. This is a common childhood condition and the testicles often descend naturally into the scrotum during his first year. In some cases, the testicles may not descend at all and will remain in the abdomen unless treated. Men with undescended testicles have a much higher chance of having testicular cancer than those whose testicles descended at birth or soon afterwards.

You’re also more likely to develop testicular cancer if you:

  • Are white
  • Have a family history of testicular cancer or undescended testicles
  • Have previously had testicular cancer

The first sign of testicular cancer is often a lump or swelling in one of your testicles. Other symptoms may include:

  • Changes in the shape or texture of your testicles
  • Pain in your back, groin or lower abdomen
  • Pain, aching or feeling of heaviness in your scrotum
  • Tenderness or swelling in the breast or nipple – caused by hormonal changes

Having one or more of these testicular cancer symptoms doesn’t mean you have cancer, as they may be caused by other, benign (non-cancerous) conditions. It’s best to speak to your primary care physician for advice if you have any concerns. The sooner your cancer is detected, the better the chance of it being successfully treated.

We offer the latest diagnostic tests and treatments for testicular cancers as standard, including surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Your care team can also give you advice about wellbeing and nutrition that you can follow throughout the course of your treatment and beyond.

We know from our experience that high-quality care means treating you as a person and not just your cancer. Our expert team will treat your disease in the best way possible, while offering as much personal support as you need.

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Anaheim (Radiation oncology)

1211 W. La Palma Avenue Suite 100 Anaheim, California 92801

714-956-1686

Andalusia (Radiation oncology)

104 Medical Park Drive Andalusia, Alabama 36420

334-427-5001

Angola (Radiation oncology)

516 E. Maumee Street Angola, Indiana 46703

260-624-2120

Asheville (Medical oncology)

20 Medical Park Drive Asheville, North Carolina 28803

828-254-8232

Asheville (Radiation oncology)

20 Medical Park Drive Asheville, North Carolina 28803

828-253-7077

Asheville (Urology)

1 Hospital Drive Suite 102 Asheville, North Carolina 28801

Asheville (Urology)

1 Hospital Drive Suite 102 Asheville, NC 28801

828-253-5314

Asheville (Urology)

1 Doctor's Park Asheville, North Carolina 28801

828-253-5314

Aventura (Medical oncology)

20601 East Dixie Highway Suite 330 Aventura, Florida 33180-1542

305-932-4198

Aventura (Medical oncology)

3585 NE 207th Street Suite C6 Aventura, Florida 33180-3772

833-376-6265

Aventura (Radiation oncology)

21355 East Dixie Highway Suite 111 Aventura, Florida 33180

305-692-1100

Aventura (Urology)

21110 Biscayne Blvd. Suite 401 Aventura, Florida 33180

305-933-1772

Aventura (Urology)

21150 Biscayne Boulevard Suite 404 Aventura, Florida 33180

305-466-9111

Belle Glade (Urology)

1100 S. Main Street Belle Glade, Florida 33430

561-790-2111

Beverly Hills (Radiation oncology)

3406 N. Lecanto Highway, Suite A Beverly Hills, Florida 34465

352-746-1100

Boca Raton (Breast surgery)

9960 Central Park Blvd. N. Suite 100 Boca Raton, Florida 33428

561-482-1728

Boca Raton (Breast surgery)

9325 Glades Road Suite 101 Boca Raton, Florida 33434

561-482-8887

Boca Raton (Medical oncology)

21020 State Road 7 Suite 200B Boca Raton, Florida 33428-1320

833-376-6265

Boca Raton (Medical oncology)

3651 Fau Boulevard Suite 100 Boca Raton, Florida 33431-6489

833-376-6265

Boca Raton (Medical oncology)

21020 State Road 7 Suite 100 Boca Raton, Florida 33428

561-742-0065

Boca Raton (Medical oncology)

9970 Central Park Boulevard North Suite 304 Boca Raton, Florida 33428

561-482-6611

Boca Raton (Medical oncology)

9960 Central Park Blvd North, Suite 100, Boca Raton

561-742-0065

Boca Raton (Radiation oncology)

21020 State Road 7 Boca Raton, Florida 33428

561-883-8656

Boca Raton (Radiation oncology)

3651 FAU Boulevard Suite 100 Boca Raton, Florida 33431

561-826-3334

Boca Raton (Urology)

9325 Glades Road Suite 101 Boca Raton, Florida 33434

561-482-8887

Boca Raton (Urology)

9970 Central Park Blvd. N. Suite 207 Boca Raton, Florida 33428

561-487-5506

Bonita Springs (Radiation oncology)

8991 Brighton Lane Bonita Springs, Florida 34135

239-949-3130

Bonita Springs (Urology)

3501 Health Center Blvd. Suite 2420 Bonita Springs, Florida 34135

239-226-2727

Bonita Springs (Urology)

26800 South Tamiami Trail Bonita Bay Medical Center, Suite 250 Bonita Springs, Florida 34134

239-434-8565

Bonita Springs (Urology)

3501 Health Center Boulevard Suite 2420 Bonita Springs, Florida 34135

239-689-8800

Boynton Beach (Medical oncology)

2623 S. Seacrest Blvd. Suite 216 Boynton Beach, Florida 33435

561-742-0065

Boynton Beach (Radiation oncology)

10301 Hagen Ranch Road Suite A-960 Boynton Beach, Florida 33437

561-374-5440

Boynton Beach (Radiation oncology)

2301 West Woolbright Rd. Boynton Beach, Florida 33426

561-737-2339

Boynton Beach (Urology)

8198 Jog Road Suite 209 Boynton Beach, Florida 33437

561-790-2111

Bradenton (Urology)

5809 21st Avenue West Bradenton, Florida 34209

941-792-0340

Bradenton (Urology)

6310 Health Park Way Ste. 100 Lakewood Ranch, Florida 34202

941-792-0340

Bradenton (Urology)

200 3rd Avenue West Suite 210 Bradenton, Florida 34205

941-792-0340

Bradenton (Urology)

1040 River Heritage Boulevard Suite 209 Bradenton, Florida 34212

941-309-7000

Bradenton (Urology)

4351 Cortez Rd. W Suite 201 Bradenton FL 34210

941-917-8488

Bradenton east (Radiation oncology)

401 Manatee Avenue East Suite A Bradenton, Florida 34208

941-748-4324

Bradenton west (Radiation oncology)

6215 21st Avenue West Suite B Bradenton, Florida 34209

Brevard (Radiation oncology)

70 Neely Road Brevard, North Carolina 28712

828-883-5620

Broward (Urology)

Parkridge Professional Center 2021 East Commercial Boulevard, Suite 302 Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33308

954-491-4950

Burleson (Radiation oncology)

11805 South Freeway, Suite 201 Burleson, Texas 76028

817-886-8730

Cape Coral (Breast surgery)

14 Del Prado N Suite 302 Cape Coral, Florida 33909

239-936-0441

Cape Coral (Colorectal surgery)

2721 Del Prado Boulevard, South Suite 210 Cape Coral, Florida 33904

239-275-0728

Cape Coral (Ear, nose and throat)

24 Del Prado Blvd N Cape Coral, Florida 33990

239-772-2171

Cape Coral (General surgery)

1206 Country Club Boulevard Cape Coral, Florida 33990

239-574-7454

Cape Coral (Radiation oncology)

1419 SE 8th Terrace Cape Coral, Florida 33990

239-772-3202

Cape Coral (Sleep and pulmonary)

126 Del Prado Blvd. North Suite 106 Cape Coral, Florida 33909

239-437-6670

Cape Coral (Urologoy)

1255 Viscaya Parkway Suite 201 Cape Coral, Florida 33990

239-689-8800

Cape Coral (Urology)

2721 Del Prado Blvd. S. Suite 230B Cape Coral, Florida 33904

239-458-1196

Cape Coral (Urology)

1206 Country Club Boulevard Cape Coral, Florida 33990

239-226-2727

Clarkston (Radiation oncology)

6770 Dixie Highway Suite 106 Clarkston, Michigan 48346

248-625-0300

Clinton (Radiation oncology)

215 Beaman Street Clinton, North Carolina 28328

910-590-2065

Clyde (Medical oncology)

49 Spicewood Dr. Suite 10 B Clyde, North Carolina 28721

828-456-5214

Clyde (Radiation oncology)

49 Spicewood Drive Suite 10 A Clyde, North Carolina 28721

Coconut Creek (Radiation oncology)

4848 Coconut Creek Pkwy. Suite 100 Coconut Creek, Florida 33063

954-379-4848

Conway (Radiation oncology)

8059 Myrtle Trace Drive Conway, South Carolina 29526

843-234-5505

Coral Springs (Breast surgery)

1311 University Drive Coral Springs, Florida 33071

954-345-2718

Coral Springs (Breast surgery)

1311 University Drive Coral Springs, Florida 33071

561-482-1728

Coral Springs (Breast surgery)

1311 University Drive Coral Springs, Florida 33071

954-985-9336

Coral Springs (Radiation oncology)

2101 Riverside Drive Suite 101 Coral Springs, Florida 33071

954-341-6200

Coral Springs (Urology)

9750 N. 33rd Street W. Suite 218 Coral Springs, Florida 33065

954-755-3801

Coral Springs (Urology)

1725 North University Drive Suite 400 Coral Springs, Florida 33071

954-752-3166

Coral Springs (Urology)

2101 Riverside Drive Suite 101 Coral Springs, Florida 33071

954-748-4771

Coral Springs (Urology)

1670 North University Drive Suite A Coral Springs, Florida 33071

954-227-6747

Corbin (Radiation oncology)

1707 Cumberland Falls Highway Corbin, Kentucky 40701

606-523-0868

Crestview (Medical oncology)

601 Redstone Avenue West Crestview, Florida 32536

850-683-0003

Crestview (Radiation oncology)

601 Redstone Avenue West Crestview, Florida 32536

850-683-0003

Dallas (Medical oncology)

12606 Greenville Avenue, Suite 160, Dallas, TX, USA

469-364-7880

Dallas (Radiation oncology)

12606 Greenville Ave, Suite 160 Dallas, Texas 75243

469-364-7880

Danville (Radiation oncology)

520 Techwood Drive Suite 200 Danville, Kentucky 40422

859-236-9819

Deerfield Beach (Radiation oncology)

201 East Sample Road Deerfield Beach, Florida 33064

954-786-6838

Delray Beach (General surgery)

5258 Linton Blvd. Suite 104 Delray Beach, Florida 33484

561-808-8492

Delray Beach (Urology)

4600 Linton Blvd. Suite 240 Delray Beach, Florida 33445

561-637-6061

Dothan (Radiation oncology)

4274 West Main Street Dothan, Alabama 36305

334-793-2312

El Segundo (Radiation oncology)

860 Parkview Drive North El Segundo, California 90245

310-414-9990

Englewood (Radiation oncology)

720 Doctors Drive Englewood, Florida 34223

941-475-7128

Englewood (Urology)

720 Doctors Way Englewood, Florida 34223

941-625-1550

Enterprise (Radiation oncology)

203 E. Adams Ave. Enterprise, Alabama 36330

334-347-5316

Fairlea (Radiation oncology)

187 Skylar Drive Fairlea, West Virginia 24901

Farmington Hills (Radiation oncology)

28595 Orchard Lake Road Suite 110 Farmington Hills, Michigan 48334

248-553-0606

Fernandina Beach (Medical oncology)

1699 South 14th Street Suites 1-3 Fernandina Beach, Florida 32034

904-427-1370

Forest City (Radiation oncology)

171 Daniel Road Forest City, North Carolina 28043

828-286-8669

Fort Lauderdale (Radiation oncology)

1600 South Andrews Avenue Suite 100 Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33316

954-355-5365

Fort Lauderdale (Urology)

5601 North Dixie Highway Suite 320 Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33334

954-491-0030

Fort Lauderdale (Urology)

2150 South Andrews Avenue Suite 100 Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 33316

954-463-6408

Fort Myers (Breast surgery)

7451 Gladiolus Drive Fort Myers, Florida 33908

Fort Myers (Breast surgery)

8931 Colonial Center Drive Suite 301 Fort Myers, Florida 33905

239-277-0479

Fort Myers (Colorectal surgery)

13770 Plantation Road Suite 2 Fort Myers, Florida 33912

239-275-0728

Fort Myers (Colorectal surgery)

13770 Plantation Road Ste. 2 Ft. Myers, Florida 33912

239-275-0728

Fort Myers (Ear, nose and throat)

15761 New Hampshire Court Fort Myers, Florida 33908

239-415-8377

Fort Myers (Ear, nose and throat)

39 Barkley Circle Fort Myers, Florida 33907

239-936-1616

Fort Myers (General surgery)

13691 Metro Parkway Suite 350 Fort Myers, Florida 33912

239-768-5313

Fort Myers (General surgery)

21 Barkley Circle Fort Myers, Florida 33907

239-939-2616

Fort Myers (Gynecologic oncology)

8931 Colonial Center Drive Suite 400 Fort Myers, Florida 33905

239-334-6626

Fort Myers (Pathology)

1860 Boy Scout Drive Suite 207 Fort Myers, Florida 33907

239-936-0908

Fort Myers (Pulmonology)

7335 Gladiolus Drive Fort Myers, Florida 33908

239-985-1925

Fort Myers (Radiation oncology)

3680 Broadway Boulevard Fort Myers, Florida 33901

239-936-0380

Fort Myers (Radiation oncology)

7341 Gladiolus Drive Fort Myers, Florida 33908

239-489-3420

Fort Myers (Radiation oncology)

8931 Colonial Center Drive Suite 100 Fort Myers, Florida 33905

239-936-0382

Fort Myers (Sleep and pulmonary)

16420 Healthpark Commons Drive Suite 100 Fort Myers, Florida 33908

239-437-6670

Fort Myers (Surgical oncology)

4571 Colonial Blvd. Suite 210 Fort Myers, Florida 33966

239-333-0772

Fort Myers (Surgical oncology)

8925 Colonial Center Drive Suite 2000 Fort Myers, Florida 33905

239-333-0995

Fort Myers (Urology)

8931 Colonial Center Dr. Suite 100 Fort Myers, Florida 33905

239-458-1196

Fort Myers (Urology)

4571 Colonial Blvd. Fort Myers, Florida 33966

239-226-2727

Fort Myers (Urology)

7451 Gladiolus Drive Suite A Fort Myers, Florida 33908

239-689-8800

Fort Pierce (Radiation oncology)

5550 S. US 1 Fort Pierce, Florida 34982

772-293-0377

Fort Walton Beach (Radiation oncology)

1026 Mar-Walt Drive Fort Walton Beach, Florida 32547

850-863-5294

Fort Walton Beach (Urology)

914 Mar Walt Drive Suite B Fort Walton Beach, Florida 32547

850-226-6572

Fort Wayne (Radiation oncology)

7910 West Jefferson Boulevard Suite 110 Fort Wayne, Indiana 46804

260-436-4116

Fort Wayne (Radiation oncology)

11050 Parkview Circle Drive Fort Wayne, Indiana 46845

833-724-8326

Fort Worth (Radiation oncology)

800 W Magnolia Ave Fort Worth, Texas 76104

817-886-8730

Fountain Valley (Radiation oncology)

11190 Warner Avenue Suite 115 Fountain Valley, California 92708

714-210-0140

Frankfort (Radiation oncology)

2 Physicians Park Drive Frankfort, Kentucky 40601

502-223-3551

Franklin (Radiation oncology)

190 Riverview Street Franklin, North Carolina 28734

Georgetown (Urology)

1001 N. Fraser St Georgetown, South Carolina 29440

843-527-2421

Goldsboro (Radiation oncology)

2802 McLamb Place Goldsboro, North Carolina 27534

Greenbelt (Radiation oncology)

7503 Greenway Center Drive Greenbelt, Maryland 20770

Greenville (Radiation oncology)

524 Moye Boulevard Greenville, North Carolina 27834

252-551-6300

Hallandale (Urology)

2500 E. Hallandale Beach Boulevard PH2 Hallandale, Florida 33009

954-456-6500

Henderson (Radiation oncology)

52 North Pecos Road Henderson, Nevada 89074

702-990-4761

Hendersonville (Radiation oncology)

95 Doctors Drive Hendersonville, North Carolina 28792

Hendersonville (Urology)

2315 Asheville Hwy, Suite 40 Hendersonville, NC 28792

828-253-5314

Hermiston (Radiation oncology)

1050 W. Elm Ave. Suite 150 Hermiston, Oregon 97838

541-289-2060

Hialeah (Radiation oncology)

2001 W. 68th Street Hialeah, Florida 33016

305-364-2110

Hialeah (Urology)

7150 West 20th Ave Suite 406 Hialeah, Florida 33016

305-820-1050

Hialeah (Urology)

7100 W. 20th Avenue Suite G154 Hialeah, Florida 33016

305-558-6518

Hollywood (Breast surgery)

Lotus Office Center 3800 Johnson St. Hollywood, Florida 33021

954-985-9336

Hollywood (Urology)

6100 Hollywood Boulevard Suite 105 Hollywood, Florida 33024

954-987-3010

Hollywood (Urology)

4030 Sheridan Street Suite C Hollywood, Florida 33021

954-961-7500

Hollywood (Urology)

1150 North 35th Avenue Suite 670 Hollywood, Florida 33021

954-704-3900

Jacksonville (Medical oncology)

425 North Lee Street Suite 104 Jacksonville, Florida 32204

904-805-7050

Jacksonville (Medical oncology)

15255 Max Leggett Parkway Suite 6000 Jacksonville, Florida 32218

904-427-8600

Jacksonville (Medical oncology)

425 North Lee Street Suite 204 Jacksonville, Florida 32204

904-427-1200

Jacksonville (Medical oncology)

7751 Baymeadows Road East Suite 205 Jacksonville, Florida 32256

904-427-1050

Jacksonville (Radiation oncology)

7751 Baymeadows Road East Suite 101 Jacksonville, Florida 32256

904-645-5045

Jupiter (Breast surgery)

210 Jupiter Lakes Blvd. Bldg 5000, Suite 202 Jupiter, Florida 33458

561-748-1242

Jupiter (Medical oncology)

431 University Boulevard Jupiter, Florida 33458

561-748-2488

Jupiter (Radiation oncology)

225 Chimney Corner Lane Suite 1011 Jupiter, Florida 33458

561-275-1820

Jupiter (Urology)

Three Palms Center 2141 S Highway A1A Alt Jupiter, Florida 33477

561-790-2111

Kennewick (Radiation oncology)

7379 West Deschutes Avenue Suite 100 Kennewick, Washington 99336

509-987-1800

Key West (Medical oncology)

3426 North Roosevelt Boulevard Key West, Florida 33040

305-296-0021

Key West (Radiation oncology)

3426 North Roosevelt Boulevard Key West, Florida 33040

305-296-0021

Kinston (Radiation oncology)

703 Doctors Drive Kinston, North Carolina 28501

252-522-7600

Lake Worth (Urology)

5065 State Road 7 Suite 203 Lake Worth, Florida 33449

561-432-0067

Lakewood Ranch (Radiation oncology)

8946 77th Terrace East Lakewood Ranch, Florida 34202

941-907-9053

Lakewood Ranch (Urology)

5860 Ranch Lake Blvd. Suite 200 Lakewood Ranch, Florida 34202

941-309-7000

Lakewood Ranch (Urology)

6310 Health Parkway suite 210 Lakewood Ranch, Florida 34202

941-917-8488

Las Vegas (Radiation oncology)

2851 North Tenaya Way Suite 100 Las Vegas, Nevada 89128

702-894-5100

Las Vegas (Radiation oncology)

3006 South Maryland Parkway Suite 100 Las Vegas, Nevada 89109

702-243-3340

Lauderdale Lakes (Radiation oncology)

4850 W. Oakland Park Blvd. Suite C Lauderdale Lakes, Florida 33313

954-485-7707

Lehigh Acres (Ear, nose and throat)

260 Beth Stacey Boulevard Suite 230 Lehigh Acres, Florida 33936

239-368-5575

Lehigh Acres (Pulmonology)

1120 Lee Boulevard Lehigh Acres, Florida 33936

239-437-6670

Lehigh Acres (Radiation oncology)

1120 Lee Boulevard Lehigh Acres, Florida 33936

239-369-4141

Little River (Urology)

3600 Sea Mountain Highway Suite B Little River, South Carolina 29566

843-280-5151

Live Oak (Radiation oncology)

12705 Toepperwein Road Live Oak Oak, Texas 78233

210-816-4770

Lodi (Radiation oncology)

311 S. Ham Lane Lodi, California 95242

Lompoc (Radiation oncology)

1213 East Ocean Avenue Suite 100 Lompoc, California 93436

805-736-8628

London (Radiation oncology)

165 London Mountain View Drive London, Kentucky 40769

606-862-6120

Loris (Urology)

3617 Casey Street Loris, South Carolina 29569

843-756-6319

Louisville (Radiation oncology)

4500 Churchman Avenue Suite 100 Louisville, Kentucky 40215

Macomb (Radiation oncology)

17435 Hall Road Macomb, Michigan 48044

Madison Heights (Radiation oncology)

30365 Dequindre Street Madison Heights, Michigan 48071

Marco (Urology)

531 Bald Eagle Drive Marco Island, Florida 34145

239-434-8565

Margate (Medical oncology)

2964 N. State Road 7 Suite 330 Margate, Florida 33063

954-984-9998

Marianna (Radiation oncology)

3031 Carters Mill Road Marianna, Florida 32446

850-526-2104

Marion (Medical oncology)

63 South Medical Court Marion, North Carolina 28752

Marion (Radiation oncology)

63 South Medical Court Marion, North Carolina 28752

Marion (Urology)

63 South Medical Ct. Marion, North Carolina 28752

828-253-5314

Martinsburg (Radiation oncology)

2000 Foundation Way Suite 1100 - McCormack Center Martinsburg, West Virginia 25401

Mesquite (Medical oncology)

1645 North Town East Blvd, Suite 503 Mesquite, Texas 75150

469-547-6541

Miami (Medical oncology)

78 S.W. 13th. Avenue Suite 200 Miami, Florida 33135

305-642-6966

Miami (Radiation oncology)

78 S.W. 13th Avenue Suite 100 Miami, Florida 33135

305-649-2104

Miami (Radiation oncology)

14233 S.W. 42nd Street Miami, Florida 33175

786-439-3779

Miami (Radiation oncology)

6825 S.W. 87th Avenue Miami, Florida 33173

786-476-8854

Miami (Urology)

3661 South Miami Ave. Suite 904 Miami, Florida 33133

305-854-5811

Miami (Urology)

3661 South Miami Ave. Suite 1006 Miami, Florida 33133

305-856-5057

Miami (Urology)

2601 SW 37th Ave Suite 904 Miami, Florida 33133

305-446-2380

Miami (Urology)

3659 S. Miami Ave Suite 2001 Miami, Florida 33133

305-324-7444

Midwest City (Medical oncology)

230 North Midwest Boulevard, Midwest City, OK, USA

405-737-8455

Midwest City (Radiation oncology)

230 North Midwest Boulevard, Midwest City, OK, USA

405-737-8455

Miramar (Medical oncology)

12741 Miramar Parkway Suite 306 Miramar, Florida 33027-2905

954-862-5300

Miramar (Urology)

1951 SW 172nd Avenue Suite 203 Miramar, Florida 33029

786-563-3463

Miramar (Urology)

1951 SW 172nd Avenue, Suite 300 Miramar, Florida 33029

954-499-7696

Modesto (Radiation oncology)

1316 Nelson Avenue Modesto, California 95350

Moore (Radiation oncology)

2117 Riverwalk Drive, Moore, OK, USA

405-703-1400

Murrells Inlet (Urology)

4367 Riverwood Drive Unit 100 Murrells Inlet, South Carolina 29576

843-652-4000

Murrells Inlet (Urology)

3911 Highway 17 Bypass Murrells Inlet, South Carolina 29576

843-652-4000

Muskogee (Medical oncology)

301 North 32nd Street, Muskogee, OK, USA

918-683-2000

Muskogee (Radiation oncology)

301 North 32nd Street, Muskogee, OK, USA

918-683-2000

Myrtle Beach (Radiation oncology)

4708 Oleander Drive Myrtle Beach, SC 29577

843-449-9415

Myrtle Beach (Urology)

101 McLeod Health Boulevard Suite 202 Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 29579

843-449-1010

Myrtle Beach (Urology)

823 82nd Parkway Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 29572

Naples (Breast surgery)

820 Goodlette Rd. N. Naples, Florida 34102

239-430-3260

Naples (General surgery)

2335 Tamiami Trail North Suite 501 Naples, Florida 34103

239-263-0011

Naples (General surgery)

6101 Pine Ridge Road Naples, Florida 34119

239-348-4123

Naples (Gynecologic oncology)

990 Tamiami Trail N. Naples, Florida 34102

239-334-6626

Naples (Radiation oncology)

1885 SW Health Parkway Naples, Florida 34109

239-593-3030

Naples (Radiation oncology)

733 4th Avenue North Naples, Florida 34102

239-436-5520

Naples (Radiation oncology)

8350 Sierra Meadows Naples, Florida 34113

239-325-1000

Naples (Radiation oncology)

955 10th Avenue North Naples, Florida 34102

239-325-1440

Naples (Surgical oncology)

990 Tamiami Trail Naples, Florida 34102

239-333-0995

Naples (Urology)

3291 Woods Edge Parkway, 1st Floor Diamond Ridge Center Bonita Springs, Florida 34134

239-434-8565

Naples (Urology)

6101 Pine Ridge Road Desk 31 Naples, Florida 34119

239-325-1600

Naples (Urology)

681 Goodlette-Frank Road Naples, Florida 34102

239-434-8565

Naples (Urology)

1044 Goodlette Road Naples, Florida 34102

239-261-5400

Niceville (General surgery)

550 Twin Cities Blvd. Suite C Niceville, Florida 32578

850-678-6601

Niceville (General surgery)

554 Twin Cities Boulevard, Suite C Niceville, Florida 32578

850-660-5204

Niceville (General surgery)

554 Twin Cities Boulevard Suite C Niceville, Florida 32578

850-729-4054

North Fort Myers (Urology)

18900 N. Tamiami Trail Unit 12 North Fort Myers, Florida 33903

239-458-1196

North Port (Urology)

2345 Bobcat Village Center Road Suite 201 North Port, Florida 34288

941-309-7000

Oakland Park (Urology)

5301 North Dixie Highway Suite 201 Oakland Park, Florida 33334

954-772-1220

Ocala (Radiation oncology)

3201 Southwest 33rd Road Ocala, Florida 34474

352-291-2495

Oklahoma City (Medical oncology)

11100 Hefner Pointe Drive, Suite A, Oklahoma City, OK, USA

405-839-7340

Oklahoma City (Radiation oncology)

11100 Hefner Pointe Drive, Suite A, Oklahoma City, OK, USA

405-839-7340

Orange Park (Medical oncology)

2141 Loch Rane Blvd. Suite 116 Orange Park, Florida 32073

904-427-1270

Orange Park (Radiation oncology)

2161 Kingsley Avenue Suite 100 Orange Park, Florida 32073

904-276-2303

Palm Beach Gardens (General surgery and breast surgery)

10335 N. Military Trail Suite C Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 33410

561-296-2556

Palm Beach Gardens (Radiation oncology)

10335 N. Military Trail Suite C Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 33410

561-624-1717

Palm Desert (Radiation oncology)

77-840 Flora Road Palm Desert, California 92211

760-200-8777

Palm Springs (Urology)

1620 S. Congress Ave. Suite 202 Palm Springs, Florida 33461

561-790-2111

Pembroke Pines (Radiation oncology)

12309 Pembroke Road Pembroke Pines, Florida 33025

954-392-4750

Pembroke Pines (Urology)

601 N. Flamingo Road Suite 319 Pembroke Pines, Florida 33028

954-392-7032

Pembroke Pines (Urology)

601 North Flamingo Road Suite 300 Pembroke Pines, Florida 33028

954-430-5200

Pembroke Pines (Urology)

601 North Flamingo Road Suite 300 Pembroke Pines, Florida 33028

954-987-3010

Pembroke Pines (Urology)

603 North Flamingo Road Suite 251 Pembroke Pines, Florida 33028

305-466-9111

Pembroke Pines (Urology)

601 N Flamingo Road Suite 402 Pembroke Pines, Florida 33028

954-704-3900

Pembroke Pines (Urology)

600 N. Hiatus Road Suite 209 Pembroke Pines, Florida 33024

954-965-9860

Plano (Medical oncology)

6957 West Plano Pkwy Suite 1300 Plano, Texas 75093

972-820-1400

Plano (Radiation oncology)

6957 West Plano Parkway, Suite 1300 Plano, Texas 75093

972-820-1400

Plantation (Radiation oncology)

350 NW 84th Avenue, Suite 102 Westside Medical Arts Building Plantation, Florida 33324

954-370-7555

Plantation (Urology)

1216 N. University Drive Plantation, Florida 33322

954-472-4072

Plantation (Urology)

350 NW 84th Ave Suite 300 Plantation, Florida 33324

954-474-2929

Ponca City (Medical oncology)

609 Virginia Ave, Ponca City, OK, USA

580-767-1300

Ponca City (Radiation oncology)

609 Virginia Ave, Ponca City, OK, USA

580-767-1300

Pontiac (Radiation oncology)

70 Fulton Street Pontiac, Michigan 48341

248-338-0300

Port Charlotte (General surgery)

18308 Murdock Circle Unit 105 Port Charlotte, Florida 33948

941-743-4150

Port Charlotte (Radiation oncology)

3175 Harbor Boulevard Port Charlotte, Florida 33952

941-627-6465

Port Charlotte (Urology)

2400 Harbor Boulevard Suite 21 Port Charlotte, Florida 33952

941-625-6992

Port Charlotte (Urology)

3410 Tamiami Trail Suite 4 Port Charlotte, Florida 33952

941-235-7281

Port Charlotte (Urology)

21260 Olean Boulevard Suite 202A Port Charlotte, Florida 33952

941-625-1550

Princeton (Radiation oncology)

660 New Hope Road Princeton, West Virginia 24740

Providence (Radiation oncology)

50 Maude Street Providence, Rhode Island 2908

401-456-2690

Punta Gorda (Urology)

713 East Marion Avenue Suite 135 Punta Gorda, Florida 33950

941-625-1550

Punta Gorda (Urology)

100 Madrid Boulevard Unit 512 Punta Gorda, Florida 33950

239-689-8800

Punta Gorda (Urology)

100 Madrid Blvd. Suite 113 Punta Gorda, Florida 33950

239-689-8800

Rancho Mirage (Radiation oncology)

40055 Bob Hope Drive Suite B Rancho Mirage, California 92270

760-202-3946

Redding (Breast surgery)

963 Butte Street Redding, California 96001

Redding (Medical oncology)

310 Hartnell Avenue Suite A Redding, California 96002

530-245-2900

Redding (Radiation oncology)

963 Butte Street Redding, California 96001

530-245-5900

Redding (Radiation oncology)

310 Hartnell Avenue Suite B Redding, California 96002

530-244-2223

Roanoke Rapids (Radiation oncology)

212 Smith Church Road Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina 27870

252-537-1717

Rogers (Medical oncology)

2526 South Pinnacle Hills Parkway, Rogers, AR, USA

479-271-8900

Rogers (Radiation oncology)

2526 Pinnacle Hills Parkway Rogers, Arkansas 72758

479-271-8900

Salinas (Radiation oncology)

1069 Los Palos Dr. Salinas, California 93901

831-758-2724

San Antonio (Radiation oncology)

8019 South New Braunfels Avenue, Suite 101 San Antonio San Antonio, Texas 78235

210-981-3051

San Luis Obispo (Radiation oncology)

100 Casa St., Suite C San Luis Obispo, California 93405

805-541-1932

Santa Cruz (Radiation oncology)

1575 Soquel Drive Santa Cruz, California 95056

831-462-3050

Santa Maria (Radiation oncology)

1325 E. Church St. Suite 101 Santa Maria, California 93454

Santa Rosa Beach (General surgery)

6879 US Hwy 98W Santa Rosa Beach, Florida 32459

850-678-6601

Santa Rosa Beach (General surgery)

6879 US Hwy 98W Santa Rosa Beach, Florida 32459

850-729-4054

Santa Rosa Beach (General surgery)

6879 US Hwy 98 Santa Rosa Beach, Florida 32459

850-660-5204

Santa Rosa Beach (Radiation oncology)

6879 US Highway 98W Santa Rosa Beach, Florida 32459

850-622-3308

Sarasota (Radiation oncology)

3663 Bee Ridge Road Sarasota, Florida 34233

941-924-8700

Sarasota (Radiation oncology)

3210 Fruitville Road Sarasota, Florida 34237

941-364-8887

Sarasota (Urology)

3325 S. Tamiami Trail Suite 200 Sarasota, Florida 34239

941-917-8488

Sarasota (Urology)

1 South School Avenue Suite 200 Sarasota, Florida 34237

941-309-7000

Simi Valley (Radiation oncology)

2985 North Sycamore Dr. Simi Valley, California 93065

805-584-6611

Southbridge (Radiation oncology)

55 Sayles Street Southbridge, Massachusetts 1550

508-765-6830

Stockton (Radiation oncology)

4722 Quail Lakes Drive Suite B Stockton, California 95207

209-472-1848

Stuart (Radiation oncology)

2111 SE Ocean Blvd. Stuart, Florida 34996

772-403-2390

Stuart (Radiation oncology)

2107 SE Ocean Blvd. Stuart, Florida 34996

772-403-2390

Sunrise (Urology)

8890 West Oakland Park Boulevard Suite 304 Sunrise, Florida 33351

954-748-4771

Tamarac (Urology)

7421 N. University Drive Suite 106 Tamarac, Florida 33321

954-722-0150

Templeton (Radiation oncology)

274 Heather Court Templeton, California 93465

805-434-1859

Thousand Oaks (Radiation oncology)

2230 Lynn Rd., Suite 103 Thousand Oaks, California 91360

805-496-4111

Troy (Radiation oncology)

4550 Investment Drive Suite B 111 Troy, Michigan 48098

248-952-5019

Tulsa (Breast surgery)

1836 East 15th Street, Tulsa, OK, USA

918-585-5658

Venice (General surgery and surgical oncology)

195 Center Road Suite B Venice, Florida 34285

941-492-6227

Venice (Radiation oncology)

901 Tamiami Trail South Venice, Florida 34285

941-485-8455

Venice (Urology)

997 US Highway 41 Bypass N Suite 202 Venice, Florida 34285

941-309-7000

Venice (Urology)

842 Sunset Lake Boulevard Suite 403 Venice, Florida 34292

941-485-3351

Venice (Urology)

4120 Woodmere Park Boulevard Suite 8A Venice, Florida 34293

941-309-7000

Ventura (Radiation oncology)

2900 Loma Vista Rd., Suite 100 Ventura, California 93003

805-648-5191

Vero Beach (Radiation oncology)

931 37th Place Vero Beach, Florida 32960

772-774-4182

Wakefield (Radiation oncology)

142 Kenyon Avenue Wakefield, Rhode Island 2879

401-284-0850

Warsaw (Radiation oncology)

1520 Provident Drive Warsaw, Indiana 46580

574-372-3800

Warwick (Radiation oncology)

450 Toll Gate Road Warwick, Rhode Island 2886

Weatherford (Radiation oncology)

920 Santa Fe Drive Weatherford, Texas 76086

817-886-8730

Weaverville (Radiation oncology)

179 N Buncombe School Rd. Weaverville, North Carolina 28787

Wellington (Breast surgery)

10141 Forest Hill Blvd. Wellington, Florida 33414

561-791-3301

Wellington (Radiation oncology)

10141 Forest Hill Blvd. Wellington, Florida 33414

561-793-6500

Wellington (Radiation oncology)

3343 State Road 7 Wellington, Florida 33449

561-795-9845

Wellington (Radiation oncology)

3343 State Road 7 Wellington, Florida 33449

561-795-9845

Wellington (Urology)

10115 Forest Hill Blvd. Suite 100 Wellington, Florida 33414

561-333-1118

Wellington (Urology)

3347 State Road 7 Suite 101 Wellington, Florida 33449

561-790-2111

West Palm Beach (General surgery)

1201 N. Olive Avenue West Palm Beach, Florida 33401

561-655-4334

West Palm Beach (General surgery)

1201 N. Olive Avenue West Palm Beach, Florida 33401

561-655-4334

West Palm Beach (Radiation oncology)

1309 N. Flagler Drive West Palm Beach, Florida 33401

561-472-1272

West Palm Beach (Urology)

1411 N. Flagler Drive Suite 5100 West Palm Beach, Florida 33401

561-650-0815

West Palm Beach (Urology)

2051 45th St Suite 203 West Palm Beach, Florida 33407

561-848-8700

Westlake Village (Radiation oncology)

1240 Westlake Blvd., Suite 103 Westlake Village, California 91361

805-494-4483

Woonsocket (Radiation oncology)

115 Cass Avenue Suite 1 Woonsocket, Rhode Island 2895

401-356-1701

Yucca Valley (Radiation oncology)

58-295 29 Palms Highway Suite A Yucca Valley, California 92284

760-365-6300